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Title: Caffeine consumption among active duty United States Air Force personnel

Authors:
ORCiD logo; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1390636
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Food and Chemical Toxicology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 105; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-09-15 01:47:24; Journal ID: ISSN 0278-6915
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Knapik, Joseph J., Austin, Krista G., McGraw, Susan M., Leahy, Guy D., and Lieberman, Harris R. Caffeine consumption among active duty United States Air Force personnel. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.fct.2017.04.050.
Knapik, Joseph J., Austin, Krista G., McGraw, Susan M., Leahy, Guy D., & Lieberman, Harris R. Caffeine consumption among active duty United States Air Force personnel. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.fct.2017.04.050.
Knapik, Joseph J., Austin, Krista G., McGraw, Susan M., Leahy, Guy D., and Lieberman, Harris R. Sat . "Caffeine consumption among active duty United States Air Force personnel". United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.fct.2017.04.050.
@article{osti_1390636,
title = {Caffeine consumption among active duty United States Air Force personnel},
author = {Knapik, Joseph J. and Austin, Krista G. and McGraw, Susan M. and Leahy, Guy D. and Lieberman, Harris R.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.fct.2017.04.050},
journal = {Food and Chemical Toxicology},
number = C,
volume = 105,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Sat Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.fct.2017.04.050

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