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Title: Synthesis of quenchable amorphous diamond

Abstract

Diamond owes its unique mechanical, thermal, optical, electrical, chemical, and biocompatible materials properties to its complete sp 3-carbon network bonding. Crystallinity is another major controlling factor for materials properties. Although other Group-14 elements silicon and germanium have complementary crystalline and amorphous forms consisting of purely sp 3 bonds, purely sp 3-bonded tetrahedral amorphous carbon has not yet been obtained. In this letter, we combine high pressure and in situ laser heating techniques to convert glassy carbon into “quenchable amorphous diamond”, and recover it to ambient conditions. Our X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy experiments on the recovered sample and computer simulations confirm its tetrahedral amorphous structure and complete sp 3 bonding. This transparent quenchable amorphous diamond has, to our knowledge, the highest density among amorphous carbon materials, and shows incompressibility comparable to crystalline diamond.

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [1];  [5];  [6]
  1. Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai (China); Carnegie Inst. of Washington, Argonne, IL (United States)
  2. Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai (China)
  3. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
  4. Carnegie Inst. of Washington, Argonne, IL (United States)
  5. Stanford Univ., CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
  6. Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai (China); Carnegie Inst. of Washington, Argonne, IL (United States); Carnegie Inst. of Washington, Washington, DC (United States). Geophysical Lab.
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1390616
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Zeng, Zhidan, Yang, Liuxiang, Zeng, Qiaoshi, Lou, Hongbo, Sheng, Hongwei, Wen, Jianguo, Miller, Dean J., Meng, Yue, Yang, Wenge, Mao, Wendy L., and Mao, Ho-kwang. Synthesis of quenchable amorphous diamond. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1038/s41467-017-00395-w.
Zeng, Zhidan, Yang, Liuxiang, Zeng, Qiaoshi, Lou, Hongbo, Sheng, Hongwei, Wen, Jianguo, Miller, Dean J., Meng, Yue, Yang, Wenge, Mao, Wendy L., & Mao, Ho-kwang. Synthesis of quenchable amorphous diamond. United States. doi:10.1038/s41467-017-00395-w.
Zeng, Zhidan, Yang, Liuxiang, Zeng, Qiaoshi, Lou, Hongbo, Sheng, Hongwei, Wen, Jianguo, Miller, Dean J., Meng, Yue, Yang, Wenge, Mao, Wendy L., and Mao, Ho-kwang. Tue . "Synthesis of quenchable amorphous diamond". United States. doi:10.1038/s41467-017-00395-w. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1390616.
@article{osti_1390616,
title = {Synthesis of quenchable amorphous diamond},
author = {Zeng, Zhidan and Yang, Liuxiang and Zeng, Qiaoshi and Lou, Hongbo and Sheng, Hongwei and Wen, Jianguo and Miller, Dean J. and Meng, Yue and Yang, Wenge and Mao, Wendy L. and Mao, Ho-kwang},
abstractNote = {Diamond owes its unique mechanical, thermal, optical, electrical, chemical, and biocompatible materials properties to its complete sp3-carbon network bonding. Crystallinity is another major controlling factor for materials properties. Although other Group-14 elements silicon and germanium have complementary crystalline and amorphous forms consisting of purely sp3 bonds, purely sp3-bonded tetrahedral amorphous carbon has not yet been obtained. In this letter, we combine high pressure and in situ laser heating techniques to convert glassy carbon into “quenchable amorphous diamond”, and recover it to ambient conditions. Our X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy experiments on the recovered sample and computer simulations confirm its tetrahedral amorphous structure and complete sp3 bonding. This transparent quenchable amorphous diamond has, to our knowledge, the highest density among amorphous carbon materials, and shows incompressibility comparable to crystalline diamond.},
doi = {10.1038/s41467-017-00395-w},
journal = {Nature Communications},
number = 1,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Aug 22 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Aug 22 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2works
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