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Title: Geothermal System Extensions

Abstract

This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-EE0000318. The City of Boise operates and maintains the nation’s largest geothermal heating district. Today, 91 buildings are connected, providing space heating to over 5.5 million square feet, domestic water heating, laundry and pool heating, sidewalk snowmelt and other related uses. Approximately 300 million gallons of 177°F geothermal water is pumped annually to buildings and institutions located in downtown Boise. The closed loop system returns all used geothermal water back into the aquifer after heat has been removed via an Injection Well. Water injected back into the aquifer has an average temperature of 115°F. This project expanded the Boise Geothermal Heating District (Geothermal System) to bring geothermal energy to the campus of Boise State University and to the Central Addition Eco-District. In addition, this project also improved the overall system’s reliability and increased the hydraulic capacity.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Boise City Corporation, ID (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Boise City Corporation, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Geothermal Technologies Office (EE-4G)
OSTI Identifier:
1390575
Report Number(s):
DE-EE0000318
DOE Contract Number:
EE0000318
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY

Citation Formats

Gunnerson, Jon, and Pardy, James J. Geothermal System Extensions. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1390575.
Gunnerson, Jon, & Pardy, James J. Geothermal System Extensions. United States. doi:10.2172/1390575.
Gunnerson, Jon, and Pardy, James J. Sat . "Geothermal System Extensions". United States. doi:10.2172/1390575. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1390575.
@article{osti_1390575,
title = {Geothermal System Extensions},
author = {Gunnerson, Jon and Pardy, James J.},
abstractNote = {This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-EE0000318. The City of Boise operates and maintains the nation’s largest geothermal heating district. Today, 91 buildings are connected, providing space heating to over 5.5 million square feet, domestic water heating, laundry and pool heating, sidewalk snowmelt and other related uses. Approximately 300 million gallons of 177°F geothermal water is pumped annually to buildings and institutions located in downtown Boise. The closed loop system returns all used geothermal water back into the aquifer after heat has been removed via an Injection Well. Water injected back into the aquifer has an average temperature of 115°F. This project expanded the Boise Geothermal Heating District (Geothermal System) to bring geothermal energy to the campus of Boise State University and to the Central Addition Eco-District. In addition, this project also improved the overall system’s reliability and increased the hydraulic capacity.},
doi = {10.2172/1390575},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Sep 30 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Sep 30 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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