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Title: Auto-magnetizing liners for Magnetized Inertial Fusion: Helically-wound composite liners.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1390464
Report Number(s):
SAND2016-8764C
Journal ID: ISSN 1070--664X; 647192
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Volume: 24; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: Proposed for presentation at the BEAMS 2016 held September 18-22, 2016 in Estoril, Portugal.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Slutz, Stephen A., Jennings, Christopher Ashley, Awe, Thomas James, Shipley, Gabriel A., Lamppa, Kerry P., Rovang, Dean C., Gomez, Matthew R, Hutsel, Brian Thomas, and McBride, Ryan D. Auto-magnetizing liners for Magnetized Inertial Fusion: Helically-wound composite liners.. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4973551.
Slutz, Stephen A., Jennings, Christopher Ashley, Awe, Thomas James, Shipley, Gabriel A., Lamppa, Kerry P., Rovang, Dean C., Gomez, Matthew R, Hutsel, Brian Thomas, & McBride, Ryan D. Auto-magnetizing liners for Magnetized Inertial Fusion: Helically-wound composite liners.. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4973551.
Slutz, Stephen A., Jennings, Christopher Ashley, Awe, Thomas James, Shipley, Gabriel A., Lamppa, Kerry P., Rovang, Dean C., Gomez, Matthew R, Hutsel, Brian Thomas, and McBride, Ryan D. 2016. "Auto-magnetizing liners for Magnetized Inertial Fusion: Helically-wound composite liners.". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4973551. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1390464.
@article{osti_1390464,
title = {Auto-magnetizing liners for Magnetized Inertial Fusion: Helically-wound composite liners.},
author = {Slutz, Stephen A. and Jennings, Christopher Ashley and Awe, Thomas James and Shipley, Gabriel A. and Lamppa, Kerry P. and Rovang, Dean C. and Gomez, Matthew R and Hutsel, Brian Thomas and McBride, Ryan D},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4973551},
journal = {},
number = 1,
volume = 24,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • Abstract not provided.
  • Here, the MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) concept has demonstrated fusion-relevant plasma conditions on the Z accelerator using external field coils to magnetize the fuel before compression. We present a novel concept (AutoMag), which uses a composite liner with helical conduction paths separated by insulating material to provide fuel magnetization from the early part of the drive current, which by design rises slowly enough to avoid electrical breakdown of the insulators. Once the magnetization field is established, the drive current rises more quickly, which causes the insulators to break down allowing the drive current to follow an axial path andmore » implode the liner in the conventional z-pinch manner. There are two important advantages to AutoMag over external field coils for the operation of MagLIF. Low inductance magnetically insulated power feeds can be used to increase the drive current, and AutoMag does not interfere with diagnostic access. Also, AutoMag enables a pathway to energy applications for MagLIF, since expensive field coils will not be damaged each shot. Finally, it should be possible to generate Field Reversed Configurations (FRC) by using both external field coils and AutoMag in opposite polarities. This would provide a means to studying FRC liner implosions on the 100 ns time scale.« less
  • Cited by 2
  • Abstract not provided.
  • Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) requires the fast compression of hot, dense plasmas by a conducting liner. The authors have used two-dimensional MHD calculations to study the electromagnetic implosion of metallic liners driven by realistic current waveforms. Parametric studies have indicated that the liner should reach velocities of 3--20 km/s, depending on the magnetic field configuration, and reach convergence ratios (initial radius divided by final radius) of at least 10. These parameters are accessible with large capacitor bank power supplies such as SHIVA or ATLAS, or with magnetic flux compression generators. One issue with the high currents that are required tomore » implode the liner is that Ohmic heating will melt or vaporize the outer part of the liner. Calculations have shown that this is a realistic concern. The authors are currently addressing questions of liner instability and flux diffusion under MTF conditions. Another issue is that the magnetic fields needed to inhibit thermal losses to the walls will also heat, melt, or vaporize the inner wall surfaces. For initial fields between 5--50 Tesla, the wall heating is significant but does not result in rapid melting. As the implosion evolves, flux compression leads to fields in excess of 100 Tesla. Calculations which include flux diffusion, Ohmic heating, and realistic materials properties show that a significant fraction of the inner surface of an aluminum liner will have melted and vaporized in the final microsecond of implosion. It is not clear at this time that such material mixes will the hot plasma. They are conducting studies to determine the extent of wall-plasma interaction under these conditions.« less