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Title: Xanthos – A Global Hydrologic Model

Abstract

Xanthos is a Python model designed to quantify and analyze global water availability historically and in the future at 0.5° × 0.5° spatial resolution and a monthly time step. Its performance and functionality was tested through real-world applications. It is open-source, extensible and accessible for researchers who work on long-term climate data for studies of global water supply, and the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). This package integrates inherent global gridded data maps, I/O modules, hydrologic processes and diagnostics modules parameterized by a user-defined configuration file.

Authors:
ORCiD logo; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1390431
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-126584
Journal ID: ISSN 2049-9647; KP1703030
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Open Research Software; Journal Volume: 5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
hydrology; global; climate change impacts; model and simulation

Citation Formats

Li, Xinya, Vernon, Chris R., Hejazi, Mohamad I., Link, Robert P., Feng, Leyang, Liu, Yaling, and Rauchenstein, Lynn T. Xanthos – A Global Hydrologic Model. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.5334/jors.181.
Li, Xinya, Vernon, Chris R., Hejazi, Mohamad I., Link, Robert P., Feng, Leyang, Liu, Yaling, & Rauchenstein, Lynn T. Xanthos – A Global Hydrologic Model. United States. doi:10.5334/jors.181.
Li, Xinya, Vernon, Chris R., Hejazi, Mohamad I., Link, Robert P., Feng, Leyang, Liu, Yaling, and Rauchenstein, Lynn T. 2017. "Xanthos – A Global Hydrologic Model". United States. doi:10.5334/jors.181.
@article{osti_1390431,
title = {Xanthos – A Global Hydrologic Model},
author = {Li, Xinya and Vernon, Chris R. and Hejazi, Mohamad I. and Link, Robert P. and Feng, Leyang and Liu, Yaling and Rauchenstein, Lynn T.},
abstractNote = {Xanthos is a Python model designed to quantify and analyze global water availability historically and in the future at 0.5° × 0.5° spatial resolution and a monthly time step. Its performance and functionality was tested through real-world applications. It is open-source, extensible and accessible for researchers who work on long-term climate data for studies of global water supply, and the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). This package integrates inherent global gridded data maps, I/O modules, hydrologic processes and diagnostics modules parameterized by a user-defined configuration file.},
doi = {10.5334/jors.181},
journal = {Journal of Open Research Software},
number = ,
volume = 5,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 9
}
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