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Title: Fabrication of Periodic Gold Nanocup Arrays Using Colloidal Lithography

Abstract

Within recent years, the field of plasmonics has exploded as researchers have demonstrated exciting applications related to chemical and optical sensing in combination with new nanofabrication techniques. A plasmon is a quantum of charge density oscillation that lends nanoscale metals such as gold and silver unique optical properties. In particular, gold and silver nanoparticles exhibit localized surface plasmon resonances—collective charge density oscillations on the surface of the nanoparticle—in the visible spectrum. Here, we focus on the fabrication of periodic arrays of anisotropic plasmonic nanostructures. These half-shell (or nanocup) structures can exhibit additional unique light-bending and polarization dependent optical properties that simple isotropic nanostructures cannot. Researchers are interested in the fabrication of periodic arrays of nanocups for a wide variety of applications such as low-cost optical devices, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, and tamper indication. We present a scalable technique based on colloidal lithography in which it is possible to easily fabricate large periodic arrays of nanocups using spin-coating and self-assembled commercially available polymeric nanospheres. Electron microscopy and optical spectroscopy from the visible to near-IR was performed to confirm successful nanocup fabrication. We conclude with a demonstration of the transfer of nanocups to a flexible, conformal adhesive film.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1390414
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-121501
Journal ID: ISSN 1940-087X; jove; 400809000
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Visualized Experiments
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Issue: 127; Journal ID: ISSN 1940-087X
Publisher:
MyJoVE Corp.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
nano

Citation Formats

DeVetter, Brent M., Bernacki, Bruce E., Bennett, Wendy D., Schemer-Kohrn, Alan, and Alvine, Kyle J. Fabrication of Periodic Gold Nanocup Arrays Using Colloidal Lithography. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3791/56204.
DeVetter, Brent M., Bernacki, Bruce E., Bennett, Wendy D., Schemer-Kohrn, Alan, & Alvine, Kyle J. Fabrication of Periodic Gold Nanocup Arrays Using Colloidal Lithography. United States. doi:10.3791/56204.
DeVetter, Brent M., Bernacki, Bruce E., Bennett, Wendy D., Schemer-Kohrn, Alan, and Alvine, Kyle J. Sun . "Fabrication of Periodic Gold Nanocup Arrays Using Colloidal Lithography". United States. doi:10.3791/56204.
@article{osti_1390414,
title = {Fabrication of Periodic Gold Nanocup Arrays Using Colloidal Lithography},
author = {DeVetter, Brent M. and Bernacki, Bruce E. and Bennett, Wendy D. and Schemer-Kohrn, Alan and Alvine, Kyle J.},
abstractNote = {Within recent years, the field of plasmonics has exploded as researchers have demonstrated exciting applications related to chemical and optical sensing in combination with new nanofabrication techniques. A plasmon is a quantum of charge density oscillation that lends nanoscale metals such as gold and silver unique optical properties. In particular, gold and silver nanoparticles exhibit localized surface plasmon resonances—collective charge density oscillations on the surface of the nanoparticle—in the visible spectrum. Here, we focus on the fabrication of periodic arrays of anisotropic plasmonic nanostructures. These half-shell (or nanocup) structures can exhibit additional unique light-bending and polarization dependent optical properties that simple isotropic nanostructures cannot. Researchers are interested in the fabrication of periodic arrays of nanocups for a wide variety of applications such as low-cost optical devices, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, and tamper indication. We present a scalable technique based on colloidal lithography in which it is possible to easily fabricate large periodic arrays of nanocups using spin-coating and self-assembled commercially available polymeric nanospheres. Electron microscopy and optical spectroscopy from the visible to near-IR was performed to confirm successful nanocup fabrication. We conclude with a demonstration of the transfer of nanocups to a flexible, conformal adhesive film.},
doi = {10.3791/56204},
journal = {Journal of Visualized Experiments},
issn = {1940-087X},
number = 127,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {1}
}