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Title: Coupled near-field and far-field exposure assessment framework for chemicals in consumer products

Authors:
ORCiD logo; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1390392
Grant/Contract Number:
DW-89-92298301
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Environment International
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 94; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-09-14 13:50:53; Journal ID: ISSN 0160-4120
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Fantke, Peter, Ernstoff, Alexi S., Huang, Lei, Csiszar, Susan A., and Jolliet, Olivier. Coupled near-field and far-field exposure assessment framework for chemicals in consumer products. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.envint.2016.06.010.
Fantke, Peter, Ernstoff, Alexi S., Huang, Lei, Csiszar, Susan A., & Jolliet, Olivier. Coupled near-field and far-field exposure assessment framework for chemicals in consumer products. United States. doi:10.1016/j.envint.2016.06.010.
Fantke, Peter, Ernstoff, Alexi S., Huang, Lei, Csiszar, Susan A., and Jolliet, Olivier. 2016. "Coupled near-field and far-field exposure assessment framework for chemicals in consumer products". United States. doi:10.1016/j.envint.2016.06.010.
@article{osti_1390392,
title = {Coupled near-field and far-field exposure assessment framework for chemicals in consumer products},
author = {Fantke, Peter and Ernstoff, Alexi S. and Huang, Lei and Csiszar, Susan A. and Jolliet, Olivier},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.envint.2016.06.010},
journal = {Environment International},
number = C,
volume = 94,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.envint.2016.06.010

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  • A thorough understanding of the routes and magnitudes of chemical exposures that consumers experience during the use of a household product is needed as part of a well-founded risk assessment for that product and its components. This review describes some sources of generic consumer data (eg, relevant body weight or total body surface area for a given human age), and exposure-related data (eg, task frequency and duration) for specific product types needed for exposure assessments. The review also contains a discussion of the importance of statistical characterization of the consumer data (eg, does its range follow a normal, log-normal, ormore » other type of distribution ). The importance of examining these data for correlative interactions is emphasized.25 references.« less
  • Fragranced consumer products are pervasive in society. Relatively little is known about the composition of these products, due to lack of prior study, complexity of formulations, and limitations and protections on ingredient disclosure in the U.S. We investigated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from 25 common fragranced consumer products-laundry products, personal care products, cleaning supplies, and air fresheners-using headspace analysis with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Our analysis found 133 different VOCs emitted from the 25 products, with an average of 17 VOCs per product. Of these 133 VOCs, 24 are classified as toxic or hazardous under U.S. federal laws, andmore » each product emitted at least one of these compounds. For 'green' products, emissions of these compounds were not significantly different from the other products. Of all VOCs identified across the products, only 1 was listed on any product label, and only 2 were listed on any material safety data sheet (MSDS). While virtually none of the chemicals identified were listed, this nonetheless accords with U.S. regulations, which do not require disclosure of all ingredients in a consumer product, or of any ingredients in a mixture called 'fragrance.' Because the analysis focused on compounds emitted and listed, rather than exposures and effects, it makes no claims regarding possible risks from product use. Results of this study contribute to understanding emissions from common products, and their links with labeling and legislation.« less
  • Sixty-Hz magnetic field exposures were measured for 45 adult residents of Maine. Thirty of the subjects resided near rights-of-way (ROWs) with either 345- and 115-kV transmission lines, or ROWs with only 115-kV transmission lines; fifteen resided far from any transmission lines. Personal exposure data for a single 24-hour period was acquired with the EMDEX. The EMDEX's event-marker button was used to partition exposures into Home and Away components. Also, three area measurements were taken for each subject during the personal exposure measurement period: (1) 24-hr fixed-site bedroom measurement with a second EMDEX; (2) Spot measurements in at least three roomsmore » of every residence; and (3) Spot measurements outside each residence. Residence near transmission lines highly loaded during the measurement period was associated with increased Home and Total exposure relative to a far-away population. Average exposure level while away from home was uniform (at about 2 mG) throughout the study population. On a quantitative level, Home exposure was correlated equivalently with Spot-In (r = .70) and the 24-hr fixed site measurement (r = .68). Correlations of area measurements with Total exposure were weaker because of the dilution effect of Away exposure (r = .64 for Spot-In; r = .61 for 24-h Bedroom). Away and Home exposures were not correlated (r = .14), which reinforced our confidence that the participants used the EMDEX correctly. The data suggest the need for caution before inferences are drawn about total personal exposure from area measurements. The study demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining valid measures of magnetic-field exposure with the personal exposure monitors that have been developed.« less
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