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Title: Growth-independent cross-feeding modifies boundaries for coexistence in a bacterial mutualism: Growth-independent metabolism in a mutualism

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1390348
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0008131
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Environmental Microbiology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 19; Journal Issue: 9; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-09-14 08:48:15; Journal ID: ISSN 1462-2912
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

McCully, Alexandra L., LaSarre, Breah, and McKinlay, James B. Growth-independent cross-feeding modifies boundaries for coexistence in a bacterial mutualism: Growth-independent metabolism in a mutualism. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1111/1462-2920.13847.
McCully, Alexandra L., LaSarre, Breah, & McKinlay, James B. Growth-independent cross-feeding modifies boundaries for coexistence in a bacterial mutualism: Growth-independent metabolism in a mutualism. United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/1462-2920.13847.
McCully, Alexandra L., LaSarre, Breah, and McKinlay, James B. 2017. "Growth-independent cross-feeding modifies boundaries for coexistence in a bacterial mutualism: Growth-independent metabolism in a mutualism". United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/1462-2920.13847.
@article{osti_1390348,
title = {Growth-independent cross-feeding modifies boundaries for coexistence in a bacterial mutualism: Growth-independent metabolism in a mutualism},
author = {McCully, Alexandra L. and LaSarre, Breah and McKinlay, James B.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1111/1462-2920.13847},
journal = {Environmental Microbiology},
number = 9,
volume = 19,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on July 24, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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