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Title: Software development infrastructure for the HYBRID modeling and simulation project

Abstract

One of the goals of the HYBRID modeling and simulation project is to assess the economic viability of hybrid systems in a market that contains renewable energy sources like wind. The idea is that it is possible for the nuclear plant to sell non-electric energy cushions, which absorb (at least partially) the volatility introduced by the renewable energy sources. This system is currently modeled in the Modelica programming language. To assess the economics of the system, an optimization procedure is trying to find the minimal cost of electricity production. The RAVEN code is used as a driver for the whole problem. It is assumed that at this stage, the HYBRID modeling and simulation framework can be classified as non-safety “research and development” software. The associated quality level is Quality Level 3 software. This imposes low requirements on quality control, testing and documentation. The quality level could change as the application development continues.Despite the low quality requirement level, a workflow for the HYBRID developers has been defined that include a coding standard and some documentation and testing requirements. The repository performs automated unit testing of contributed models. The automated testing is achieved via an open-source python script called BuildingsP from Lawrencemore » Berkeley National Lab. BuildingsPy runs Modelica simulation tests using Dymola in an automated manner and generates and runs unit tests from Modelica scripts written by developers. In order to assure effective communication between the different national laboratories a biweekly videoconference has been set-up, where developers can report their progress and issues. In addition, periodic face-face meetings are organized intended to discuss high-level strategy decisions with management. A second means of communication is the developer email list. This is a list to which everybody can send emails that will be received by the collective of the developers and managers involved in the project. Thirdly, to exchange documents quickly, a SharePoint directory has been set-up. SharePoint allows teams and organizations to intelligently share, and collaborate on content from anywhere.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1389725
Report Number(s):
INL/EXT-16-40004
DOE Contract Number:
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES; COMPUTER CODES; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; HYBRID; HYBRID Modeling and simulation

Citation Formats

Epiney, Aaron S., Kinoshita, Robert A., Kim, Jong Suk, Rabiti, Cristian, and Greenwood, M. Scott. Software development infrastructure for the HYBRID modeling and simulation project. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1389725.
Epiney, Aaron S., Kinoshita, Robert A., Kim, Jong Suk, Rabiti, Cristian, & Greenwood, M. Scott. Software development infrastructure for the HYBRID modeling and simulation project. United States. doi:10.2172/1389725.
Epiney, Aaron S., Kinoshita, Robert A., Kim, Jong Suk, Rabiti, Cristian, and Greenwood, M. Scott. 2016. "Software development infrastructure for the HYBRID modeling and simulation project". United States. doi:10.2172/1389725. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1389725.
@article{osti_1389725,
title = {Software development infrastructure for the HYBRID modeling and simulation project},
author = {Epiney, Aaron S. and Kinoshita, Robert A. and Kim, Jong Suk and Rabiti, Cristian and Greenwood, M. Scott},
abstractNote = {One of the goals of the HYBRID modeling and simulation project is to assess the economic viability of hybrid systems in a market that contains renewable energy sources like wind. The idea is that it is possible for the nuclear plant to sell non-electric energy cushions, which absorb (at least partially) the volatility introduced by the renewable energy sources. This system is currently modeled in the Modelica programming language. To assess the economics of the system, an optimization procedure is trying to find the minimal cost of electricity production. The RAVEN code is used as a driver for the whole problem. It is assumed that at this stage, the HYBRID modeling and simulation framework can be classified as non-safety “research and development” software. The associated quality level is Quality Level 3 software. This imposes low requirements on quality control, testing and documentation. The quality level could change as the application development continues.Despite the low quality requirement level, a workflow for the HYBRID developers has been defined that include a coding standard and some documentation and testing requirements. The repository performs automated unit testing of contributed models. The automated testing is achieved via an open-source python script called BuildingsP from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. BuildingsPy runs Modelica simulation tests using Dymola in an automated manner and generates and runs unit tests from Modelica scripts written by developers. In order to assure effective communication between the different national laboratories a biweekly videoconference has been set-up, where developers can report their progress and issues. In addition, periodic face-face meetings are organized intended to discuss high-level strategy decisions with management. A second means of communication is the developer email list. This is a list to which everybody can send emails that will be received by the collective of the developers and managers involved in the project. Thirdly, to exchange documents quickly, a SharePoint directory has been set-up. SharePoint allows teams and organizations to intelligently share, and collaborate on content from anywhere.},
doi = {10.2172/1389725},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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