skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE) Field Campaign Report

Abstract

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE) is the most technologically advanced atmospheric and climate science campaign yet fielded in Antarctica. AWARE was motivated be recent concern about the impact of cryospheric mass loss on global sea level rise. Specifically, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) is now the second largest contributor to rising sea level, after the Greenland Ice Sheet. As steadily warming ocean water erodes the grounding lines of WAIS components where they meet the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas, the retreating grounding lines moving inland and downslope on the underlying terrain imply mechanical instability of the entire WAIS. There is evidence that this point of instability may have already been reached, perhaps signifying more rapid loss of WAIS ice mass. At the same time, the mechanical support provided by adjacent ice shelves, and also the fundamental stability of exposed ice cliffs at the ice sheet grounding lines, will be adversely impacted by a warming atmosphere that causes more frequent episodes of surface melting. The surface meltwater damages the ice shelves and ice cliffs through hydrofracturing. With the increasing concern regarding these rapid cryospheric changes, AWARE was motivated by the needmore » to (a) diagnose the surface energy balance in West Antarctica as related to both summer season climatology and potential surface melting, and (b) improve global climate model (GCM) performance over Antarctica, such that future cryospheric projections can be more reliable.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [1]
  1. Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Scripps Inst. of Oceanography
  2. Ohio State University
  3. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
  4. Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
DOE Office of Science Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Contributing Org.:
Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Ohio State University, Pennsylvania State University
OSTI Identifier:
1389616
Report Number(s):
DOE/SC-ARM-17-028
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-7601830
Resource Type:
Program Document
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
ARM West Antarctic Radiation, ice shelf loss, climatology, global climate models Experiment (AWARE), ARM Mobile Facility, cloud radars, atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer, high-spectral-resolution lidar, micropulse lidar, aerosol observing system

Citation Formats

Lubin, Daniel, Bromwich, David H, Vogelmann, Andrew M, Verlinde, Johannes, and Russell, Lynn M. ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE) Field Campaign Report. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Lubin, Daniel, Bromwich, David H, Vogelmann, Andrew M, Verlinde, Johannes, & Russell, Lynn M. ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE) Field Campaign Report. United States.
Lubin, Daniel, Bromwich, David H, Vogelmann, Andrew M, Verlinde, Johannes, and Russell, Lynn M. Fri . "ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE) Field Campaign Report". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1389616.
@article{osti_1389616,
title = {ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE) Field Campaign Report},
author = {Lubin, Daniel and Bromwich, David H and Vogelmann, Andrew M and Verlinde, Johannes and Russell, Lynn M},
abstractNote = {The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE) is the most technologically advanced atmospheric and climate science campaign yet fielded in Antarctica. AWARE was motivated be recent concern about the impact of cryospheric mass loss on global sea level rise. Specifically, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) is now the second largest contributor to rising sea level, after the Greenland Ice Sheet. As steadily warming ocean water erodes the grounding lines of WAIS components where they meet the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas, the retreating grounding lines moving inland and downslope on the underlying terrain imply mechanical instability of the entire WAIS. There is evidence that this point of instability may have already been reached, perhaps signifying more rapid loss of WAIS ice mass. At the same time, the mechanical support provided by adjacent ice shelves, and also the fundamental stability of exposed ice cliffs at the ice sheet grounding lines, will be adversely impacted by a warming atmosphere that causes more frequent episodes of surface melting. The surface meltwater damages the ice shelves and ice cliffs through hydrofracturing. With the increasing concern regarding these rapid cryospheric changes, AWARE was motivated by the need to (a) diagnose the surface energy balance in West Antarctica as related to both summer season climatology and potential surface melting, and (b) improve global climate model (GCM) performance over Antarctica, such that future cryospheric projections can be more reliable.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Sep 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Sep 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Program Document:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that may hold this item.

Save / Share: