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Title: A high quantum yield molecule-protein complex fluorophore for near-infrared II imaging

Abstract

Fluorescence imaging in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II) allows visualization of deep anatomical features with an unprecedented degree of clarity. NIR-II fluorophores draw from a broad spectrum of materials spanning semiconducting nanomaterials to organic molecular dyes, yet unfortunately all water-soluble organic molecules with 41,000 nm emission suffer from low quantum yields that have limited temporal resolution and penetration depth. We report tailoring the supramolecular assemblies of protein complexes with a sulfonated NIR-II organic dye (CH-4T) to produce a brilliant 110-fold increase in fluorescence, resulting in the highest quantum yield molecular fluorophore thus far. The bright molecular complex allowed for the fastest video-rate imaging in the second NIR window with B50-fold reduced exposure times at a fast 50 frames-per-second (FPS) capable of resolving mouse cardiac cycles. Additionally, we demonstrate that the NIR-II molecular complexes are superior to clinically approved ICG for lymph node imaging deep within the mouse body.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [3];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [3]; ORCiD logo [1];  [3];  [3]; ORCiD logo [4];  [1];  [3]
  1. Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry
  2. Wuhan Univ. (China). State Key Lab. of Virology, Key Lab. of Combinatorial Biosynthesis and Drug Discovery; Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Molecular Imaging Program (MIPS), Dept. of Radiology, Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection
  3. Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Molecular Imaging Program (MIPS), Dept. of Radiology, Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection
  4. Wuhan Univ. (China). State Key Lab. of Virology, Key Lab. of Combinatorial Biosynthesis and Drug Discovery
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stanford Univ., CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1389584
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0008397
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; biomedical materials; fluorescence imaging; supramolecular chemistry

Citation Formats

Antaris, Alexander L., Chen, Hao, Diao, Shuo, Ma, Zhuoran, Zhang, Zhe, Zhu, Shoujun, Wang, Joy, Lozano, Alexander X., Fan, Quli, Chew, Leila, Zhu, Mark, Cheng, Kai, Hong, Xuechuan, Dai, Hongjie, and Cheng, Zhen. A high quantum yield molecule-protein complex fluorophore for near-infrared II imaging. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1038/ncomms15269.
Antaris, Alexander L., Chen, Hao, Diao, Shuo, Ma, Zhuoran, Zhang, Zhe, Zhu, Shoujun, Wang, Joy, Lozano, Alexander X., Fan, Quli, Chew, Leila, Zhu, Mark, Cheng, Kai, Hong, Xuechuan, Dai, Hongjie, & Cheng, Zhen. A high quantum yield molecule-protein complex fluorophore for near-infrared II imaging. United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms15269.
Antaris, Alexander L., Chen, Hao, Diao, Shuo, Ma, Zhuoran, Zhang, Zhe, Zhu, Shoujun, Wang, Joy, Lozano, Alexander X., Fan, Quli, Chew, Leila, Zhu, Mark, Cheng, Kai, Hong, Xuechuan, Dai, Hongjie, and Cheng, Zhen. 2017. "A high quantum yield molecule-protein complex fluorophore for near-infrared II imaging". United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms15269. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1389584.
@article{osti_1389584,
title = {A high quantum yield molecule-protein complex fluorophore for near-infrared II imaging},
author = {Antaris, Alexander L. and Chen, Hao and Diao, Shuo and Ma, Zhuoran and Zhang, Zhe and Zhu, Shoujun and Wang, Joy and Lozano, Alexander X. and Fan, Quli and Chew, Leila and Zhu, Mark and Cheng, Kai and Hong, Xuechuan and Dai, Hongjie and Cheng, Zhen},
abstractNote = {Fluorescence imaging in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II) allows visualization of deep anatomical features with an unprecedented degree of clarity. NIR-II fluorophores draw from a broad spectrum of materials spanning semiconducting nanomaterials to organic molecular dyes, yet unfortunately all water-soluble organic molecules with 41,000 nm emission suffer from low quantum yields that have limited temporal resolution and penetration depth. We report tailoring the supramolecular assemblies of protein complexes with a sulfonated NIR-II organic dye (CH-4T) to produce a brilliant 110-fold increase in fluorescence, resulting in the highest quantum yield molecular fluorophore thus far. The bright molecular complex allowed for the fastest video-rate imaging in the second NIR window with B50-fold reduced exposure times at a fast 50 frames-per-second (FPS) capable of resolving mouse cardiac cycles. Additionally, we demonstrate that the NIR-II molecular complexes are superior to clinically approved ICG for lymph node imaging deep within the mouse body.},
doi = {10.1038/ncomms15269},
journal = {Nature Communications},
number = ,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}

Journal Article:
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