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Title: Telematics Options and Capabilities

Abstract

This presentation describes the data tracking and analytical capabilities of telematics devices. Federal fleet managers can use the systems to keep their drivers safe, maintain a fuel efficient fleet, ease their reporting burden, and save money. The presentation includes an example of how much these capabilities can save fleets.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Federal Energy Management Program Office (EE-5F)
OSTI Identifier:
1389212
Report Number(s):
NREL/PR-5400-70045
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at Energy Exchange 2017, 15-17 August 2017, Tampa, Florida
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; Telematics; federal fleets; cost savings

Citation Formats

Hodge, Cabell. Telematics Options and Capabilities. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Hodge, Cabell. Telematics Options and Capabilities. United States.
Hodge, Cabell. 2017. "Telematics Options and Capabilities". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1389212.
@article{osti_1389212,
title = {Telematics Options and Capabilities},
author = {Hodge, Cabell},
abstractNote = {This presentation describes the data tracking and analytical capabilities of telematics devices. Federal fleet managers can use the systems to keep their drivers safe, maintain a fuel efficient fleet, ease their reporting burden, and save money. The presentation includes an example of how much these capabilities can save fleets.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 9
}

Conference:
Other availability
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