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Title: ACCELERATOR PHYSICS CHALLENGES IN THE DESIGN OF MULTI-BEND-ACHROMAT-BASED STORAGE RINGS

Abstract

With the recent success in commissioning of MAX IV, the multi-bend achromat (MBA) lattice has begun to deliver on its promise to usher in a new generation of higher-brightness synchrotron light sources. In this paper, we begin by reviewing the challenges, recent success, and lessons learned of the MAX-IV project. Drawing on these lessons, we then describe the physics challenges in even more ambitious rings and how these can be met. In addition, we touch on engineering issues and choices that are tightly linked with the physics design.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1389064
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2016 North American Particle Accelerator Conference, 10/09/16 - 10/14/16, Chicago, IL, US
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Borland, M., Hettel, R., Leemann, S. C., and Robin, D. S. ACCELERATOR PHYSICS CHALLENGES IN THE DESIGN OF MULTI-BEND-ACHROMAT-BASED STORAGE RINGS. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.18429.
Borland, M., Hettel, R., Leemann, S. C., & Robin, D. S. ACCELERATOR PHYSICS CHALLENGES IN THE DESIGN OF MULTI-BEND-ACHROMAT-BASED STORAGE RINGS. United States. doi:10.18429.
Borland, M., Hettel, R., Leemann, S. C., and Robin, D. S. Thu . "ACCELERATOR PHYSICS CHALLENGES IN THE DESIGN OF MULTI-BEND-ACHROMAT-BASED STORAGE RINGS". United States. doi:10.18429. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1389064.
@article{osti_1389064,
title = {ACCELERATOR PHYSICS CHALLENGES IN THE DESIGN OF MULTI-BEND-ACHROMAT-BASED STORAGE RINGS},
author = {Borland, M. and Hettel, R. and Leemann, S. C. and Robin, D. S.},
abstractNote = {With the recent success in commissioning of MAX IV, the multi-bend achromat (MBA) lattice has begun to deliver on its promise to usher in a new generation of higher-brightness synchrotron light sources. In this paper, we begin by reviewing the challenges, recent success, and lessons learned of the MAX-IV project. Drawing on these lessons, we then describe the physics challenges in even more ambitious rings and how these can be met. In addition, we touch on engineering issues and choices that are tightly linked with the physics design.},
doi = {10.18429},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • Not very long ago, the 3{sup rd} generation storage ring technology was judged as mature. Most of the 3{sup rd} generation storage rings used the Double-Bend Achromat (DBA) or Triple-Bend Achromat (TBA) concepts. It was however a well-known fact that increasing the number of magnet cells in the rings is a powerful way of decreasing the electron beam emittance and thus the source brilliance, but at the penalty of increasing the size and cost of the rings. Preserving the Dynamic Aperture (DA) in the rings became also an issue when increasing the number of magnet cells. The Multi-Bend Achromat (MBA)more » concept, including a miniaturization of the ring elements, has now drastically changed the picture. The MBA rings, now in construction or being planned, offer orders of magnitudes higher brilliance than rings of conventional designs. Several light sources around the world are now implementing or planning to implement this MBA concept. This article touches on the science drivers for higher brilliance. We will then describe the MBA concept with its advantages as well as its challenges. A short survey of the MBA activity around the world will also be presented. The author apologies for focusing on the MAX IV project regarding technical solutions. This is motivated by that MAX IV is the facility he knows best and it might be regarded as a fore-runner for the MBA concept.« less
  • A 67-pm hybrid-seven-bend achromat (H7BA) lattice is proposed for a futureAdvanced Photon Source (APS)multibend- achromat (MBA) upgrade. This lattice requires use of a swap-out (on-axis) injection scheme. Alternate lattice design work has also been performed to achieve better beam dynamics performance than the nominal APS MBA lattice, in order to allow beam accumulation. One of such alternate H7BA lattice designs, which still targets a very low emittance of 76 pm, is discussed in this paper. With these lattices, existing APS injector complex can be employed without the requirement of a very high charge operation. Studies show that an emittance belowmore » 76 pm can be achieved with the employment of reverse bends in an alternate lattice. We discuss the predicted performance and requirements for these lattices and compare them to the nominal lattice.« less
  • The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is currently investigating replacing the existing two-bend 7 GeV lattice with a 6 GeV seven-bend achromat magnet lattice in order to achieve a low electron beam emittance [1]. This new lattice requires 1320 magnets, of which there are nine types. These include high strength quadrupoles (gradient up to ~97 T/m), sextupoles with second derivative of field up to ~7000 T/m2, longitudinal gradient dipoles with field ratio of up to 5, and transverse gradient dipoles with gradients of ~50 T/m and central field of ~0.6 T. These field requirements and the limited space available pose severalmore » design challenges. This paper presents a summary of magnet designs for the various magnet types developed through a collaboration of APS with FNAL and BNL.« less
  • Six dimensional ionization cooling of muons is needed to achieve the necessary luminosity for a muon collider. If that cooling could occur over multiple turns in a closed ring, there would be significant cost savings over a single-pass cooling channel. We report on the status of a cooling ring with achromatic arcs. The achromatic design permits the design to easily switch between a closed ring and a snaking geometry on injection or extraction from the ring. The ring is designed with sufficient space in each superperiod for injection and extraction magnets. We describe the ring's lattice design, performance, and injection/extractionmore » requirements.« less