skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Evidence of molecular hydrogen trapped in two-dimensional layered titanium carbide-based MXene

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport Center (FIRST)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1389014
DOE Contract Number:
ERKCC61
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review Materials; Journal Volume: 1; Journal Issue: 2; Related Information: FIRST partners with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (lead); Argonne National Laboratory; Drexel University; Georgia State University; Northwestern University; Pennsylvania State University; Suffolk University; Vanderbilt University; University of Virginia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
catalysis (heterogeneous), solar (fuels), energy storage (including batteries and capacitors), hydrogen and fuel cells, electrodes - solar, mechanical behavior, charge transport, materials and chemistry by design, synthesis (novel materials)

Citation Formats

Osti, Naresh C., Naguib, Michael, Tyagi, Madhusudan, Gogotsi, Yury, Kolesnikov, Alexander I., and Mamontov, Eugene. Evidence of molecular hydrogen trapped in two-dimensional layered titanium carbide-based MXene. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevMaterials.1.024004.
Osti, Naresh C., Naguib, Michael, Tyagi, Madhusudan, Gogotsi, Yury, Kolesnikov, Alexander I., & Mamontov, Eugene. Evidence of molecular hydrogen trapped in two-dimensional layered titanium carbide-based MXene. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevMaterials.1.024004.
Osti, Naresh C., Naguib, Michael, Tyagi, Madhusudan, Gogotsi, Yury, Kolesnikov, Alexander I., and Mamontov, Eugene. 2017. "Evidence of molecular hydrogen trapped in two-dimensional layered titanium carbide-based MXene". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevMaterials.1.024004.
@article{osti_1389014,
title = {Evidence of molecular hydrogen trapped in two-dimensional layered titanium carbide-based MXene},
author = {Osti, Naresh C. and Naguib, Michael and Tyagi, Madhusudan and Gogotsi, Yury and Kolesnikov, Alexander I. and Mamontov, Eugene},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevMaterials.1.024004},
journal = {Physical Review Materials},
number = 2,
volume = 1,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}
  • Two-dimensional transition metal carbides and nitrides (MXenes) are one of the largest and fastest growing families of materials. The presence of molecular hydrogen at ambient conditions in a MXene (Ti 3C 2T x, where T x represents a surface terminating species, including O, OH, and F) material is revealed here by inelastic and elastic neutron scatterings. The inelastic neutron-scattering spectrum measured at 5 K shows a peak at 14.6 meV, presenting a clear indication of the presence of parahydrogen in the MXene synthesized using 48% hydrofluoric acid and annealed at 110°C in vacuum prior to the measurement. An increase inmore » the measurement temperature gradually reduces the peak intensity and increases the peak width due to the mobility of the molecular hydrogen in confinement. The presence of molecular hydrogen is confirmed further from the observed elastic intensity drop in a fixed energy-window scan of elastic intensity measurements in the temperature range of 10–35 K. Using milder etching conditions, ion intercalation, or an increase in the annealing temperature all result in the absence of the trapped hydrogen molecules in MXene. Here, the results of this paper can guide the development of MXene materials with desired properties and improve our understanding of the behavior of MXenes in applications ranging from supercapacitors to hydrogen evolution reaction catalysis and hydrogen storage.« less
  • Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides, carbonitrides, and nitrides (MXenes) were discovered in 2011. Since the original discovery, more than 20 different compositions have been synthesized by the selective etching of MAX phase and other precursors and many more theoretically predicted. They offer a variety of different properties, making the family promising candidates in a wide range of applications, such as energy storage, electromagnetic interference shielding, water purification, electrocatalysis, and medicine. These solution-processable materials have the potential to be highly scalable, deposited by spin, spray, or dip coating, painted or printed, or fabricated in a variety of ways. Due to thismore » promise, the amount of research on MXenes has been increasing, and methods of synthesis and processing are expanding quickly. The fast evolution of the material can also be noticed in the wide range of synthesis and processing protocols that determine the yield of delamination, as well as the quality of the 2D flakes produced. Furthermore we describe the experimental methods and best practices we use to synthesize the most studied MXene, titanium carbide (Ti 3C 2T x), using different etchants and delamination methods. We also explain effects of synthesis parameters on the size and quality of Ti 3C 2T x and suggest the optimal processes for the desired application.« less
  • Here, noble metal (gold or silver) nanoparticles or patterned films are typically used as substrates for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Two-dimensional (2D) carbides and nitrides (MXenes) exhibit unique electronic and optical properties, including metallic conductivity and plasmon resonance in the visible or near-infrared range, making them promising candidates for a wide variety of applications. Herein, we show that 2D titanium carbide, Ti 3C 2T x, enhances Raman signal from organic dyes on a substrate and in solution. As a proof of concept, MXene SERS substrates were manufactured by spray-coating and used to detect several common dyes, with calculated enhancement factorsmore » reaching ~10 6. Titanium carbide MXene demonstrates SERS effect in aqueous colloidal solutions, suggesting the potential for biomedical or environmental applications, where MXene can selectively enhance positively charged molecules.« less