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Title: Dissolution Trapping of Carbon Dioxide in Heterogeneous Aquifers

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [4];  [3];  [2];  [2]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, United States; Exponent, 1055 East Colorado Boulevard, Suite 500, Pasadena, California 91106, United States
  2. School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, United States
  3. Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45431, United States
  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544, United States; College of Construction Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun, China
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Center for Geologic Storage of CO2 (GSCO2)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1388971
DOE Contract Number:
SC0012504
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Science and Technology; Journal Volume: 51; Journal Issue: 13; Related Information: GSCO2 partners with University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (lead); National Energy Technology Laboratory; Schlumberger; SINTEF; Stiftelsen Norsar; Texas Tech University; University of Notre Dame; University of Southern California; University of Texas at Austin; Wright State University
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
defects, mechanical behavior, carbon sequestration, mesostructured materials

Citation Formats

Soltanian, Mohamad Reza, Amooie, Mohammad Amin, Gershenzon, Naum, Dai, Zhenxue, Ritzi, Robert, Xiong, Fengyang, Cole, David, and Moortgat, Joachim. Dissolution Trapping of Carbon Dioxide in Heterogeneous Aquifers. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.est.7b01540.
Soltanian, Mohamad Reza, Amooie, Mohammad Amin, Gershenzon, Naum, Dai, Zhenxue, Ritzi, Robert, Xiong, Fengyang, Cole, David, & Moortgat, Joachim. Dissolution Trapping of Carbon Dioxide in Heterogeneous Aquifers. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.est.7b01540.
Soltanian, Mohamad Reza, Amooie, Mohammad Amin, Gershenzon, Naum, Dai, Zhenxue, Ritzi, Robert, Xiong, Fengyang, Cole, David, and Moortgat, Joachim. Fri . "Dissolution Trapping of Carbon Dioxide in Heterogeneous Aquifers". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.est.7b01540.
@article{osti_1388971,
title = {Dissolution Trapping of Carbon Dioxide in Heterogeneous Aquifers},
author = {Soltanian, Mohamad Reza and Amooie, Mohammad Amin and Gershenzon, Naum and Dai, Zhenxue and Ritzi, Robert and Xiong, Fengyang and Cole, David and Moortgat, Joachim},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1021/acs.est.7b01540},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 13,
volume = 51,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jun 16 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Jun 16 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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