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Title: Characterization of induced seismicity patterns derived from internal structure in event clusters

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. NORSAR, Kjeller Norway
  2. Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign USA
  3. Schlumberger Carbon Services, Denver USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Center for Geologic Storage of CO2 (GSCO2)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1388970
DOE Contract Number:
SC0012504
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Geophysical Research. Solid Earth; Journal Volume: 122; Journal Issue: 5; Related Information: GSCO2 partners with University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (lead); National Energy Technology Laboratory; Schlumberger; SINTEF; Stiftelsen Norsar; Texas Tech University; University of Notre Dame; University of Southern California; University of Texas at Austin; Wright State University
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
defects, mechanical behavior, carbon sequestration, mesostructured materials

Citation Formats

Goertz-Allmann, B. P., Gibbons, S. J., Oye, V., Bauer, R., and Will, R. Characterization of induced seismicity patterns derived from internal structure in event clusters. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/2016JB013731.
Goertz-Allmann, B. P., Gibbons, S. J., Oye, V., Bauer, R., & Will, R. Characterization of induced seismicity patterns derived from internal structure in event clusters. United States. doi:10.1002/2016JB013731.
Goertz-Allmann, B. P., Gibbons, S. J., Oye, V., Bauer, R., and Will, R. Mon . "Characterization of induced seismicity patterns derived from internal structure in event clusters". United States. doi:10.1002/2016JB013731.
@article{osti_1388970,
title = {Characterization of induced seismicity patterns derived from internal structure in event clusters},
author = {Goertz-Allmann, B. P. and Gibbons, S. J. and Oye, V. and Bauer, R. and Will, R.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/2016JB013731},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research. Solid Earth},
number = 5,
volume = 122,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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