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Title: Effect of nanoscale flows on the surface structure of nanoporous catalysts

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [4];  [5];  [6]
  1. Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA; John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
  2. Department of Engineering, University of Rome “Roma Tre,” Via della Vasca Navale 79, 00143 Rome, Italy
  3. John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA; Istituto per le Applicazioni del Calcolo - CNR, CNR, Via dei Taurini 19, 00185 Rome, Italy
  4. John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA; Department of Enterprise Engineering “Mario Lucertini,” University of Rome “Tor Vergata,” Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Rome, Italy
  5. John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA; Center for Nanoscale Systems, 11 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
  6. John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA; Department of Physics, Harvard University, 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Integrated Mesoscale Architectures for Sustainable Catalysis (IMASC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1388894
DOE Contract Number:
SC0012573
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Chemical Physics; Journal Volume: 146; Journal Issue: 21; Related Information: IMASC partners with Harvard University (lead); Fritz Haber Institute; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; University of Kansas; Tufts University
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
catalysis (heterogeneous), mesostructured materials, materials and chemistry by design, synthesis (novel materials)

Citation Formats

Montemore, Matthew M., Montessori, Andrea, Succi, Sauro, Barroo, Cédric, Falcucci, Giacomo, Bell, David C., and Kaxiras, Efthimios. Effect of nanoscale flows on the surface structure of nanoporous catalysts. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4984614.
Montemore, Matthew M., Montessori, Andrea, Succi, Sauro, Barroo, Cédric, Falcucci, Giacomo, Bell, David C., & Kaxiras, Efthimios. Effect of nanoscale flows on the surface structure of nanoporous catalysts. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4984614.
Montemore, Matthew M., Montessori, Andrea, Succi, Sauro, Barroo, Cédric, Falcucci, Giacomo, Bell, David C., and Kaxiras, Efthimios. Thu . "Effect of nanoscale flows on the surface structure of nanoporous catalysts". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4984614.
@article{osti_1388894,
title = {Effect of nanoscale flows on the surface structure of nanoporous catalysts},
author = {Montemore, Matthew M. and Montessori, Andrea and Succi, Sauro and Barroo, Cédric and Falcucci, Giacomo and Bell, David C. and Kaxiras, Efthimios},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1063/1.4984614},
journal = {Journal of Chemical Physics},
number = 21,
volume = 146,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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