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Title: Achieving Reversible H 2/H + Interconversion at Room Temperature with Enzyme-Inspired Molecular Complexes: A Mechanistic Study

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, United States
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis (CME)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1388871
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: ACS Catalysis; Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 9; Related Information: CME partners with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (lead); University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Pennsylvania State University; University of Washington; University of Wyoming
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
catalysis (homogeneous), catalysis (heterogeneous), solar (fuels), bio-inspired, energy storage (including batteries and capacitors), hydrogen and fuel cells, charge transport, materials and chemistry by design, synthesis (novel materials)

Citation Formats

Priyadarshani, Nilusha, Dutta, Arnab, Ginovska, Bojana, Buchko, Garry W., O’Hagan, Molly, Raugei, Simone, and Shaw, Wendy J.. Achieving Reversible H2/H+ Interconversion at Room Temperature with Enzyme-Inspired Molecular Complexes: A Mechanistic Study. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acscatal.6b01433.
Priyadarshani, Nilusha, Dutta, Arnab, Ginovska, Bojana, Buchko, Garry W., O’Hagan, Molly, Raugei, Simone, & Shaw, Wendy J.. Achieving Reversible H2/H+ Interconversion at Room Temperature with Enzyme-Inspired Molecular Complexes: A Mechanistic Study. United States. doi:10.1021/acscatal.6b01433.
Priyadarshani, Nilusha, Dutta, Arnab, Ginovska, Bojana, Buchko, Garry W., O’Hagan, Molly, Raugei, Simone, and Shaw, Wendy J.. 2016. "Achieving Reversible H2/H+ Interconversion at Room Temperature with Enzyme-Inspired Molecular Complexes: A Mechanistic Study". United States. doi:10.1021/acscatal.6b01433.
@article{osti_1388871,
title = {Achieving Reversible H2/H+ Interconversion at Room Temperature with Enzyme-Inspired Molecular Complexes: A Mechanistic Study},
author = {Priyadarshani, Nilusha and Dutta, Arnab and Ginovska, Bojana and Buchko, Garry W. and O’Hagan, Molly and Raugei, Simone and Shaw, Wendy J.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1021/acscatal.6b01433},
journal = {ACS Catalysis},
number = 9,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
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