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Title: Electron/Ion Transport Enhancer in High Capacity Li-Ion Battery Anodes

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [3];  [5]
  1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, United States
  2. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, United States
  3. Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, United States; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, United States
  4. Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, United States; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, United States; Energy Sciences Directorate, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, United States
  5. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, United States; Department of Chemical and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, United States; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, United States
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Center for Mesoscale Transport Properties (m2M)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1388850
DOE Contract Number:
SC0012673
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Chemistry of Materials; Journal Volume: 28; Journal Issue: 18; Related Information: m2M partners with Stony Brook University (lead); Brookhaven National Laboratory; Columbia University; Georgia Institute of Technology; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; University of California, Berkeley; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
energy storage (including batteries and capacitors), charge transport, mesostructured materials

Citation Formats

Kwon, Yo Han, Minnici, Krysten, Huie, Matthew M., Takeuchi, Kenneth J., Takeuchi, Esther S., Marschilok, Amy C., and Reichmanis, Elsa. Electron/Ion Transport Enhancer in High Capacity Li-Ion Battery Anodes. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.chemmater.6b02982.
Kwon, Yo Han, Minnici, Krysten, Huie, Matthew M., Takeuchi, Kenneth J., Takeuchi, Esther S., Marschilok, Amy C., & Reichmanis, Elsa. Electron/Ion Transport Enhancer in High Capacity Li-Ion Battery Anodes. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.chemmater.6b02982.
Kwon, Yo Han, Minnici, Krysten, Huie, Matthew M., Takeuchi, Kenneth J., Takeuchi, Esther S., Marschilok, Amy C., and Reichmanis, Elsa. 2016. "Electron/Ion Transport Enhancer in High Capacity Li-Ion Battery Anodes". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.chemmater.6b02982.
@article{osti_1388850,
title = {Electron/Ion Transport Enhancer in High Capacity Li-Ion Battery Anodes},
author = {Kwon, Yo Han and Minnici, Krysten and Huie, Matthew M. and Takeuchi, Kenneth J. and Takeuchi, Esther S. and Marschilok, Amy C. and Reichmanis, Elsa},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1021/acs.chemmater.6b02982},
journal = {Chemistry of Materials},
number = 18,
volume = 28,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}
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