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Title: Time-Resolved X-ray Scattering and Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Formation of a Uranium-Vanadium-Phosphorus-Peroxide Cage Cluster

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [3]
  1. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556, United States
  2. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556, United States
  3. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556, United States; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556, United States
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Materials Science of Actinides (MSA)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1388552
DOE Contract Number:
SC0001089
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Inorganic Chemistry; Journal Volume: 55; Journal Issue: 14; Related Information: MSA partners with University of Notre Dame (lead); University of California, Davis; Florida State University; George Washington University; University of Michigan; University of Minnesota; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Oregon state University; Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Savannah River National Laboratory
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
nuclear (including radiation effects), materials and chemistry by design, synthesis (novel materials), synthesis (self-assembly)

Citation Formats

Qiu, Jie, Dembowski, Mateusz, Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S., Toh, Wen Cong, and Burns, Peter C.. Time-Resolved X-ray Scattering and Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Formation of a Uranium-Vanadium-Phosphorus-Peroxide Cage Cluster. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.inorgchem.6b00918.
Qiu, Jie, Dembowski, Mateusz, Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S., Toh, Wen Cong, & Burns, Peter C.. Time-Resolved X-ray Scattering and Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Formation of a Uranium-Vanadium-Phosphorus-Peroxide Cage Cluster. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.inorgchem.6b00918.
Qiu, Jie, Dembowski, Mateusz, Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S., Toh, Wen Cong, and Burns, Peter C.. 2016. "Time-Resolved X-ray Scattering and Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Formation of a Uranium-Vanadium-Phosphorus-Peroxide Cage Cluster". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.inorgchem.6b00918.
@article{osti_1388552,
title = {Time-Resolved X-ray Scattering and Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Formation of a Uranium-Vanadium-Phosphorus-Peroxide Cage Cluster},
author = {Qiu, Jie and Dembowski, Mateusz and Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S. and Toh, Wen Cong and Burns, Peter C.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1021/acs.inorgchem.6b00918},
journal = {Inorganic Chemistry},
number = 14,
volume = 55,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
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