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Title: Holy Grails in Chemistry: Investigating and Understanding Fast Electron/Cation Coupled Transport within Inorganic Ionic Matrices

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3]
  1. Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, United States
  2. Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, United States; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, United States
  3. Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, United States; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, United States; Energy Sciences Directorate, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11793, United States
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Center for Mesoscale Transport Properties (m2M)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1388505
DOE Contract Number:
SC0012673
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Accounts of Chemical Research; Journal Volume: 50; Journal Issue: 3; Related Information: m2M partners with Stony Brook University (lead); Brookhaven National Laboratory; Columbia University; Georgia Institute of Technology; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; University of California, Berkeley; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
energy storage (including batteries and capacitors), charge transport, mesostructured materials

Citation Formats

Smith, Paul F., Takeuchi, Kenneth J., Marschilok, Amy C., and Takeuchi, Esther S. Holy Grails in Chemistry: Investigating and Understanding Fast Electron/Cation Coupled Transport within Inorganic Ionic Matrices. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.accounts.6b00540.
Smith, Paul F., Takeuchi, Kenneth J., Marschilok, Amy C., & Takeuchi, Esther S. Holy Grails in Chemistry: Investigating and Understanding Fast Electron/Cation Coupled Transport within Inorganic Ionic Matrices. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.accounts.6b00540.
Smith, Paul F., Takeuchi, Kenneth J., Marschilok, Amy C., and Takeuchi, Esther S. Tue . "Holy Grails in Chemistry: Investigating and Understanding Fast Electron/Cation Coupled Transport within Inorganic Ionic Matrices". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.accounts.6b00540.
@article{osti_1388505,
title = {Holy Grails in Chemistry: Investigating and Understanding Fast Electron/Cation Coupled Transport within Inorganic Ionic Matrices},
author = {Smith, Paul F. and Takeuchi, Kenneth J. and Marschilok, Amy C. and Takeuchi, Esther S.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1021/acs.accounts.6b00540},
journal = {Accounts of Chemical Research},
number = 3,
volume = 50,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Mar 21 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Mar 21 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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