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Title: Tunable Light-Emitting Diodes Utilizing Quantum-Confined Layered Perovskite Emitters

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Department of Chemical Engineering and Energy Frontier Research Center for Excitonics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, United States
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Center for Excitonics (CE)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1388491
DOE Contract Number:
SC0001088
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: ACS Photonics; Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 3; Related Information: CE partners with Massachusetts Institute of Technology (lead); Brookhaven National Laboratory; Harvard University
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
solar (photovoltaic), solid state lighting, photosynthesis (natural and artificial), charge transport, optics, synthesis (novel materials), synthesis (self-assembly), synthesis (scalable processing)

Citation Formats

Congreve, Daniel N., Weidman, Mark C., Seitz, Michael, Paritmongkol, Watcharaphol, Dahod, Nabeel S., and Tisdale, William A. Tunable Light-Emitting Diodes Utilizing Quantum-Confined Layered Perovskite Emitters. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acsphotonics.6b00963.
Congreve, Daniel N., Weidman, Mark C., Seitz, Michael, Paritmongkol, Watcharaphol, Dahod, Nabeel S., & Tisdale, William A. Tunable Light-Emitting Diodes Utilizing Quantum-Confined Layered Perovskite Emitters. United States. doi:10.1021/acsphotonics.6b00963.
Congreve, Daniel N., Weidman, Mark C., Seitz, Michael, Paritmongkol, Watcharaphol, Dahod, Nabeel S., and Tisdale, William A. Tue . "Tunable Light-Emitting Diodes Utilizing Quantum-Confined Layered Perovskite Emitters". United States. doi:10.1021/acsphotonics.6b00963.
@article{osti_1388491,
title = {Tunable Light-Emitting Diodes Utilizing Quantum-Confined Layered Perovskite Emitters},
author = {Congreve, Daniel N. and Weidman, Mark C. and Seitz, Michael and Paritmongkol, Watcharaphol and Dahod, Nabeel S. and Tisdale, William A.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1021/acsphotonics.6b00963},
journal = {ACS Photonics},
number = 3,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Feb 21 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Feb 21 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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