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Title: Determination of bimetallic architectures in nanometer-scale catalysts by combining molecular dynamics simulations with x-ray absorption spectroscopy

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, USA
  2. Mathematics Department, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine 04011, USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation (CCEI)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1388332
DOE Contract Number:
SC0001004
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Chemical Physics; Journal Volume: 146; Journal Issue: 11; Related Information: CCEI partners with the University of Delaware (lead); Brookhaven National Laboratory; California Institute of Technology; Columbia University; University of Delaware; Lehigh University; University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; University of Minnesota; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; University of Pennsylvania; Princeton University; Rutgers University
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
catalysis (homogeneous), catalysis (heterogeneous), biofuels (including algae and biomass), bio-inspired, hydrogen and fuel cells, materials and chemistry by design, synthesis (novel materials), synthesis (self-assembly), synthesis (scalable processing)

Citation Formats

Timoshenko, Janis, Keller, Kayla R., and Frenkel, Anatoly I.. Determination of bimetallic architectures in nanometer-scale catalysts by combining molecular dynamics simulations with x-ray absorption spectroscopy. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4978500.
Timoshenko, Janis, Keller, Kayla R., & Frenkel, Anatoly I.. Determination of bimetallic architectures in nanometer-scale catalysts by combining molecular dynamics simulations with x-ray absorption spectroscopy. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4978500.
Timoshenko, Janis, Keller, Kayla R., and Frenkel, Anatoly I.. Tue . "Determination of bimetallic architectures in nanometer-scale catalysts by combining molecular dynamics simulations with x-ray absorption spectroscopy". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4978500.
@article{osti_1388332,
title = {Determination of bimetallic architectures in nanometer-scale catalysts by combining molecular dynamics simulations with x-ray absorption spectroscopy},
author = {Timoshenko, Janis and Keller, Kayla R. and Frenkel, Anatoly I.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1063/1.4978500},
journal = {Journal of Chemical Physics},
number = 11,
volume = 146,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Mar 21 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Mar 21 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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