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Title: Comparative physical and chemical analyses of cotton fibers from two near isogenic upland lines differing in fiber wall thickness

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Center for Lignocellulose Structure and Formation (CLSF)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1388296
DOE Contract Number:
SC0001090
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cellulose; Journal Volume: 24; Journal Issue: 6; Related Information: CLSF partners with Pennsylvania State University (lead); North Carolina State University; University of Rhode Island; Virginia Tech University
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
biofuels (including algae and biomass), bio-inspired, membrane, carbon sequestration, materials and chemistry by design, synthesis (self-assembly)

Citation Formats

Kim, Hee Jin, Lee, Christopher M., Dazen, Kevin, Delhom, Christopher D., Liu, Yongliang, Rodgers, James E., French, Alfred D., and Kim, Seong H. Comparative physical and chemical analyses of cotton fibers from two near isogenic upland lines differing in fiber wall thickness. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/s10570-017-1282-1.
Kim, Hee Jin, Lee, Christopher M., Dazen, Kevin, Delhom, Christopher D., Liu, Yongliang, Rodgers, James E., French, Alfred D., & Kim, Seong H. Comparative physical and chemical analyses of cotton fibers from two near isogenic upland lines differing in fiber wall thickness. United States. doi:10.1007/s10570-017-1282-1.
Kim, Hee Jin, Lee, Christopher M., Dazen, Kevin, Delhom, Christopher D., Liu, Yongliang, Rodgers, James E., French, Alfred D., and Kim, Seong H. Fri . "Comparative physical and chemical analyses of cotton fibers from two near isogenic upland lines differing in fiber wall thickness". United States. doi:10.1007/s10570-017-1282-1.
@article{osti_1388296,
title = {Comparative physical and chemical analyses of cotton fibers from two near isogenic upland lines differing in fiber wall thickness},
author = {Kim, Hee Jin and Lee, Christopher M. and Dazen, Kevin and Delhom, Christopher D. and Liu, Yongliang and Rodgers, James E. and French, Alfred D. and Kim, Seong H.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1007/s10570-017-1282-1},
journal = {Cellulose},
number = 6,
volume = 24,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Apr 07 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Apr 07 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • Intact, in vitro-grown cotton fibers will incorporate ({sup 14}C)glucose from externally supplied UDP({sup 14}C)glucose into a variety of cell wall components including cellulose; this labeled fraction will continue to increase up to 4 hours chase time. In the fraction soluble in hot water there was no significant change in total label; however, the largest fraction after the 30 minute pulse with UDP({sup 14}C)glucose was chloroform-methanol soluble (70%) and showed a significant decrease with chase. The lipids that make up about 85% of this fraction were identified by TLC as steryl glucosides, acylated steryl glucosides, and glucosyl-phosphoryl-polyprenol. Following the pulse, themore » loss of label from acylated steryl glucosides and glucosylphophoryl-polyprenol was almost complete within 2 hours of chase; steryl glucosides made up about 85% of the fraction at that chase time. The total loss in the lipid fraction (about 100 picomoles per milligram dry weight of fiber) with chase times of 4 hours approximates the total gain in the total glucans.« less
  • The (/sup 14/C) moiety from (/sup 3/H)UDP(/sup 14/C)glucose was incorporated by intact cotton fibers into hot water soluble, acetic-nitric reagent soluble and insoluble components, and chloroform-methanol soluble lipids; the (/sup 3/H)UDP moiety was not incorporated. The /sup 3/H-label can be exchanged rapidly with unlabeled substrate in a chase experiment. The cell wall apparent free space of cotton fibers was in the order of 30 picomoles per milligram of dry fibers; 25 picomoles per milligram easily exchanged and about 5 picomoles per milligram more tightly adsorbed. At 50 micromolar UDPglucose, 70% of the (/sup 14/C)glucose was found in the lipid fractionmore » after both a short labeling period and chase. The percent of (/sup 14/C)glucose incorporated into total glucan increased within a 30-minute chase period. The data supports the concept that glucan synthesis, including cellulose, as well as the synthesis of steryl glucosides, acetylated steryl glucosides, and glucosyl-phosphoryl-polyprenol from externally supplied UDPglucose occurs at the plasma membrane-cell wall interface. The synthase enzymes for such synthesis must be part of this interfacial membrane system.« less
  • A new technique enabling the use of cellulosic material in the fiber form during deuteration-infrared studies is reported. A minipress, modified to suit the new technique, is described. Since the material was studied in the fiber form, danger of fiber modification during film formation was avoided. Although the usual KBr pellet technique was utilized for scanning the spectra of the deuterated fibers, preparation of pellet as well as scanning were carried out under fully dry conditions, thus completely avoiding the rehydrogenation of deuterated fibers. The modified minipress containing the pellet forms an airtight assembly allowing repeat scans after any lengthmore » of time without affecting the quality of the spectra of the deuterated sample.« less
  • Comparative mutagenesis and possible synergistic interaction between broad-spectrum (313- to 405-nm) near-ultraviolet (black light bulb (BLB)) radiation and 254-nm radiation were studied in Escherichia coli strains WP2 (wild type), WP2s (uvrA), WP10 (recA), WP6 (polA), WP6s (polA uvrA), WP100 (uvrA recA), and WP5 (lexA). With BLB radiation, strains WP2s and WP6s demonstrated a high level of mutagenesis, whereas strains WP2, WP5, WP6, WP10, and WP100 did not demonstrate significant mutagenesis. In contrast, 254-nm radiation was mutagenic in strains WP2, WP2s, WP6, and WP6s, but strains WP5, WP10, and WP100 were not significantly mutated. The absence of mutagenesis by BLB radiationmore » in lexA and recA strains WP10, WP5, and WP100 suggests that lex/sup +/ rec/sup +/ repair may play a major role in mutagenesis by both BLB and 254-nm radiation. The hypothesis that BLB radiation selectively inhibits rec/sup +/ lex/sup +/ repair was tested by sequential BLB-254 nm radiation. With strain WP2, a fluence of 30 J/m/sup 2/ at 254 nm induced trp/sup +/ revertants at a frequency of 15 x 10/sup -6/. However, when 10/sup 5/ J/m/sup 2/ or more BLB radiation preceded the 254-nm exposure, no trp/sup +/ revertants could be detected. A similar inhibition of 254-nm mutagenesis was observed with strain WP6 (polA). However, strains WP2s (uvrA) and WP6s (polA uvrA) showed enhanced 254-nm mutagenesis when a prior exposure to BLB radiation was given.« less