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Title: Tunable Visibly Transparent Optics Derived from Porous Silicon

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, and Beckman Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana−Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, United States
  2. The Dow Chemical Company, 2301 N. Brazosport Boulevard, B-1470, Freeport, Texas 77541, United States
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion (LMI)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1388287
DOE Contract Number:
SC0001293
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: ACS Photonics; Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 4; Related Information: LMI partners with California Institute of Technology (lead); Harvard University; University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
solar (photovoltaic), solid state lighting, phonons, thermal conductivity, electrodes - solar, materials and chemistry by design, optics, synthesis (novel materials), synthesis (self-assembly)

Citation Formats

Ocier, Christian R., Krueger, Neil A., Zhou, Weijun, and Braun, Paul V.. Tunable Visibly Transparent Optics Derived from Porous Silicon. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acsphotonics.6b01001.
Ocier, Christian R., Krueger, Neil A., Zhou, Weijun, & Braun, Paul V.. Tunable Visibly Transparent Optics Derived from Porous Silicon. United States. doi:10.1021/acsphotonics.6b01001.
Ocier, Christian R., Krueger, Neil A., Zhou, Weijun, and Braun, Paul V.. Wed . "Tunable Visibly Transparent Optics Derived from Porous Silicon". United States. doi:10.1021/acsphotonics.6b01001.
@article{osti_1388287,
title = {Tunable Visibly Transparent Optics Derived from Porous Silicon},
author = {Ocier, Christian R. and Krueger, Neil A. and Zhou, Weijun and Braun, Paul V.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1021/acsphotonics.6b01001},
journal = {ACS Photonics},
number = 4,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 08 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 08 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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  • A solar absorber, under the sun, is heated up by sunlight. In many applications, including solar cells and outdoor structures, the absorption of sunlight is intrinsic for either operational or aesthetic considerations, but the resulting heating is undesirable. Because a solar absorber by necessity faces the sky, it also naturally has radiative access to the coldness of the universe. Therefore, in these applications it would be very attractive to directly use the sky as a heat sink while preserving solar absorption properties. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate a visibly transparent thermal blackbody, based on a silica photonic crystal. Whenmore » placed on a silicon absorber under sunlight, such a blackbody preserves or even slightly enhances sunlight absorption, but reduces the temperature of the underlying silicon absorber by as much as 13 °C due to radiative cooling. Lastly, our work shows that the concept of radiative cooling can be used in combination with the utilization of sunlight, enabling new technological capabilities.« less
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