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Title: Van der Waals Force Isolation of Monolayer MoS 2

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [4];  [3];  [5];  [2];  [6]
  1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh NC 27695 USA; Department of Fiber and Polymer Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh NC 27695 USA
  2. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 China
  3. CUNY-Advanced Science Research Center, New York NY 10031 USA; School of Physics, Georgia Institue of Technology, Atlanta GA 30332 USA
  4. Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh NC 27695 USA
  5. CUNY-Advanced Science Research Center, New York NY 10031 USA; School of Physics, Georgia Institue of Technology, Atlanta GA 30332 USA; Department of Physics, CUNY-City College of New York, New York NY 10031 USA; Phyics Program, CUNY-The Graduate Center, New York NY 10016 USA
  6. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh NC 27695 USA; Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh NC 27695 USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Center for the Computational Design of Functional Layered Materials (CCDM)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1388074
DOE Contract Number:
SC0012575
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Advanced Materials; Journal Volume: 28; Journal Issue: 45; Related Information: CCDM partners with Temple University (lead); Brookhaven National Laboratory; Drexel University; Duke University; North Carolina State University; Northeastern University; Princeton University; Rice University; University of Pennsylvania
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
catalysis (heterogeneous), solar (photovoltaic), energy storage (including batteries and capacitors), hydrogen and fuel cells, defects, mechanical behavior, materials and chemistry by design, synthesis (novel materials)

Citation Formats

Gurarslan, Alper, Jiao, Shuping, Li, Tai-De, Li, Guoqing, Yu, Yiling, Gao, Yang, Riedo, Elisa, Xu, Zhiping, and Cao, Linyou. Van der Waals Force Isolation of Monolayer MoS 2. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1002/adma.201601581.
Gurarslan, Alper, Jiao, Shuping, Li, Tai-De, Li, Guoqing, Yu, Yiling, Gao, Yang, Riedo, Elisa, Xu, Zhiping, & Cao, Linyou. Van der Waals Force Isolation of Monolayer MoS 2. United States. doi:10.1002/adma.201601581.
Gurarslan, Alper, Jiao, Shuping, Li, Tai-De, Li, Guoqing, Yu, Yiling, Gao, Yang, Riedo, Elisa, Xu, Zhiping, and Cao, Linyou. Fri . "Van der Waals Force Isolation of Monolayer MoS 2". United States. doi:10.1002/adma.201601581.
@article{osti_1388074,
title = {Van der Waals Force Isolation of Monolayer MoS 2},
author = {Gurarslan, Alper and Jiao, Shuping and Li, Tai-De and Li, Guoqing and Yu, Yiling and Gao, Yang and Riedo, Elisa and Xu, Zhiping and Cao, Linyou},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/adma.201601581},
journal = {Advanced Materials},
number = 45,
volume = 28,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Sep 30 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Sep 30 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
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