skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Radiation attenuation by single-crystal diamond windows

Abstract

As artificial diamond becomes more cost effective it is likely to see increasing use as a window for sample environment equipment used in diffraction experiments. Such windows are particularly useful as they exhibit exceptional mechanical properties in addition to being highly transparent to both X-ray and neutron radiation. A key application is in high-pressure studies, where diamond anvil cells (DACs) are used to access extreme sample conditions. However, despite their utility, an important consideration when using single-crystal diamond windows is their interaction with the incident beam. In particular, the Bragg condition will be satisfied for specific angles and wavelengths, leading to the appearance of diamond Bragg spots on the diffraction detectors but also, unavoidably, to loss of transmitted intensity of the beam that interacts with the sample. This effect can be particularly significant for energy-dispersive measurements, for example, in time-of-flight neutron diffraction work using DACs. This article presents a semi-empirical approach that can be used to correct for this effect, which is a prerequisite for the accurate determination of diffraction intensities.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Energy Frontier Research in Extreme Environments (EFree)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1388069
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0001057
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Crystallography (Online); Journal Volume: 50; Journal Issue: 1; Related Information: EFree partners with Carnegie Institution of Washington (lead); California Institute of Technology; Colorado School of Mines; Cornell University; Lehigh University; Pennsylvania State University
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
catalysis (heterogeneous), solar (photovoltaic), phonons, thermoelectric, energy storage (including batteries and capacitors), hydrogen and fuel cells, superconductivity, charge transport, mesostructured materials, materials and chemistry by design, synthesis (novel materials)

Citation Formats

Guthrie, M., Pruteanu, C. G., Donnelly, M. -E., Molaison, J. J., dos Santos, A. M., Loveday, J. S., Boehler, R., and Tulk, C. A. Radiation attenuation by single-crystal diamond windows. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1107/S1600576716018185.
Guthrie, M., Pruteanu, C. G., Donnelly, M. -E., Molaison, J. J., dos Santos, A. M., Loveday, J. S., Boehler, R., & Tulk, C. A. Radiation attenuation by single-crystal diamond windows. United States. doi:10.1107/S1600576716018185.
Guthrie, M., Pruteanu, C. G., Donnelly, M. -E., Molaison, J. J., dos Santos, A. M., Loveday, J. S., Boehler, R., and Tulk, C. A. Wed . "Radiation attenuation by single-crystal diamond windows". United States. doi:10.1107/S1600576716018185.
@article{osti_1388069,
title = {Radiation attenuation by single-crystal diamond windows},
author = {Guthrie, M. and Pruteanu, C. G. and Donnelly, M. -E. and Molaison, J. J. and dos Santos, A. M. and Loveday, J. S. and Boehler, R. and Tulk, C. A.},
abstractNote = {As artificial diamond becomes more cost effective it is likely to see increasing use as a window for sample environment equipment used in diffraction experiments. Such windows are particularly useful as they exhibit exceptional mechanical properties in addition to being highly transparent to both X-ray and neutron radiation. A key application is in high-pressure studies, where diamond anvil cells (DACs) are used to access extreme sample conditions. However, despite their utility, an important consideration when using single-crystal diamond windows is their interaction with the incident beam. In particular, the Bragg condition will be satisfied for specific angles and wavelengths, leading to the appearance of diamond Bragg spots on the diffraction detectors but also, unavoidably, to loss of transmitted intensity of the beam that interacts with the sample. This effect can be particularly significant for energy-dispersive measurements, for example, in time-of-flight neutron diffraction work using DACs. This article presents a semi-empirical approach that can be used to correct for this effect, which is a prerequisite for the accurate determination of diffraction intensities.},
doi = {10.1107/S1600576716018185},
journal = {Journal of Applied Crystallography (Online)},
number = 1,
volume = 50,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}