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Title: Investigation of wing crack formation with a combined phase-field and experimental approach: WING CRACK WITH PHASE FIELD

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1]
  1. Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin Texas USA
  2. Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, Iowa State University of Science and Technology, Ames Iowa USA
  3. UTIG, J. J. Pickle Research Campus, University of Texas at Austin, Austin Texas USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security (CFSES)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1387955
DOE Contract Number:
SC0001114
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Geophysical Research Letters; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 15; Related Information: CFSES partners with University of Texas at Austin (lead); Sandia National Laboratory
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
nuclear (including radiation effects), carbon sequestration

Citation Formats

Lee, Sanghyun, Reber, Jacqueline E., Hayman, Nicholas W., and Wheeler, Mary F. Investigation of wing crack formation with a combined phase-field and experimental approach: WING CRACK WITH PHASE FIELD. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1002/2016GL069979.
Lee, Sanghyun, Reber, Jacqueline E., Hayman, Nicholas W., & Wheeler, Mary F. Investigation of wing crack formation with a combined phase-field and experimental approach: WING CRACK WITH PHASE FIELD. United States. doi:10.1002/2016GL069979.
Lee, Sanghyun, Reber, Jacqueline E., Hayman, Nicholas W., and Wheeler, Mary F. Mon . "Investigation of wing crack formation with a combined phase-field and experimental approach: WING CRACK WITH PHASE FIELD". United States. doi:10.1002/2016GL069979.
@article{osti_1387955,
title = {Investigation of wing crack formation with a combined phase-field and experimental approach: WING CRACK WITH PHASE FIELD},
author = {Lee, Sanghyun and Reber, Jacqueline E. and Hayman, Nicholas W. and Wheeler, Mary F.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/2016GL069979},
journal = {Geophysical Research Letters},
number = 15,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 08 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Aug 08 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
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