skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Influence of amorphous structure on polymorphism in vanadia

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Center for Next Generation of Materials by Design: Incorporating Metastability (CNGMD)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1387939
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99GO10337
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: APL Materials; Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 7; Related Information: CNGMD partners with National Renewable Energy Laboratory (lead); Colorado School of Mines; Harvard University; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Oregon State University; SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
solar (photovoltaic), solar (fuels), solid state lighting, phonons, thermoelectric, hydrogen and fuel cells, defects, charge transport, optics, materials and chemistry by design, synthesis (novel materials)

Citation Formats

Stone, Kevin H., Schelhas, Laura T., Garten, Lauren M., Shyam, Badri, Mehta, Apurva, Ndione, Paul F., Ginley, David S., and Toney, Michael F.. Influence of amorphous structure on polymorphism in vanadia. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4958674.
Stone, Kevin H., Schelhas, Laura T., Garten, Lauren M., Shyam, Badri, Mehta, Apurva, Ndione, Paul F., Ginley, David S., & Toney, Michael F.. Influence of amorphous structure on polymorphism in vanadia. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4958674.
Stone, Kevin H., Schelhas, Laura T., Garten, Lauren M., Shyam, Badri, Mehta, Apurva, Ndione, Paul F., Ginley, David S., and Toney, Michael F.. 2016. "Influence of amorphous structure on polymorphism in vanadia". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4958674.
@article{osti_1387939,
title = {Influence of amorphous structure on polymorphism in vanadia},
author = {Stone, Kevin H. and Schelhas, Laura T. and Garten, Lauren M. and Shyam, Badri and Mehta, Apurva and Ndione, Paul F. and Ginley, David S. and Toney, Michael F.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1063/1.4958674},
journal = {APL Materials},
number = 7,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
  • Normally we think of the glassy state as a single phase and therefore crystallization from chemically identical amorphous precursors should be identical. Here we show that the local structure of an amorphous precursor is distinct depending on the initial deposition conditions, resulting in significant differences in the final state material. Using grazing incidence total x-ray scattering, we have determined the local structure in amorphous thin films of vanadium oxide grown under different conditions using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Here we show that the subsequent crystallization of films deposited using different initial PLD conditions result in the formation of different polymorphsmore » of VO 2. Ultimately this suggests the possibility of controlling the formation of metastable polymorphs by tuning the initial amorphous structure to different formation pathways.« less
  • Normally we think of the glassy state as a single phase and therefore crystallization from chemically identical amorphous precursors should be identical. Here we show that the local structure of an amorphous precursor is distinct depending on the initial deposition conditions, resulting in significant differences in the final state material. Using grazing incidence total x-ray scattering, we have determined the local structure in amorphous thin films of vanadium oxide grown under different conditions using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Here we show that the subsequent crystallization of films deposited using different initial PLD conditions result in the formation of different polymorphsmore » of VO 2. Ultimately this suggests the possibility of controlling the formation of metastable polymorphs by tuning the initial amorphous structure to different formation pathways.« less
  • Normally we think of the glassy state as a single phase and therefore crystallization from chemically identical amorphous precursors should be identical. Here we show that the local structure of an amorphous precursor is distinct depending on the initial deposition conditions, resulting in significant differences in the final state material. Using grazing incidence total x-ray scattering, we have determined the local structure in amorphous thin films of vanadium oxide grown under different conditions using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Here we show that the subsequent crystallization of films deposited using different initial PLD conditions result in the formation of different polymorphsmore » of VO 2. This suggests the possibility of controlling the formation of metastable polymorphs by tuning the initial amorphous structure to different formation pathways.« less
  • Vanadia-silica mixed oxides were prepared via the sol-gel method involving acid catalysis together with prehydrolysis in order to achieve matching of the reactivities of vanadium (V) oxide triisopropoxide and tetraethoxysilicon(IV) precursors. Gelation was forced by the addition of basic solution. The as-received gels were supercritically dried by semicontinuous extraction with supercritical CO{sub 2} at 313 K (low-temperature aerogels). The effects of composition, aging, and calcination temperature on the chemical, structural, and textural properties of the solids were investigated. The oxides were characterized by N{sub 2} physisorption, XRD, vibrational spectroscopy, thermal analysis, UV-vis,and {sup 51}V NMR. The low-temperature vanadia-silica aerogels weremore » mesoporous and highly disperse. The increasing V content from 5 to 20 wt % nominal V{sub 2}O{sub 5} caused a gradual decline in V dispersion. For 30 wt % {open_quotes}V{sub 2}O{sub 5}{close_quotes} the continuous formation of V-O-V connectivity resulted in crystallization of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The effect of aging to basic medium confined to the textural properties, significantly increasing BET surface area and especially pore volume. The prepared aerogels revealed a marked lack of stability against both apolar solvents in the presence of peroxides and polar solvents. The marked thermal stability in air at {le}873 K, however, combined with mesoporosity and high V dispersion, render these solids promising catalysts for gas-phase reactions. 58 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.« less