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Title: Mapping reactive flow patterns in monolithic nanoporous catalysts

Authors:
ORCiD logo; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Integrated Mesoscale Architectures for Sustainable Catalysis (IMASC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1387937
DOE Contract Number:
SC0012573
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Microfluidics and Nanofluidics; Journal Volume: 20; Journal Issue: 7; Related Information: IMASC partners with Harvard University (lead); Fritz Haber Institute; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; University of Kansas; Tufts University
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
catalysis (heterogeneous), mesostructured materials, materials and chemistry by design, synthesis (novel materials)

Citation Formats

Falcucci, Giacomo, Succi, Sauro, Montessori, Andrea, Melchionna, Simone, Prestininzi, Pietro, Barroo, Cedric, Bell, David C., Biener, Monika M., Biener, Juergen, Zugic, Branko, and Kaxiras, Efthimios. Mapping reactive flow patterns in monolithic nanoporous catalysts. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1007/s10404-016-1767-5.
Falcucci, Giacomo, Succi, Sauro, Montessori, Andrea, Melchionna, Simone, Prestininzi, Pietro, Barroo, Cedric, Bell, David C., Biener, Monika M., Biener, Juergen, Zugic, Branko, & Kaxiras, Efthimios. Mapping reactive flow patterns in monolithic nanoporous catalysts. United States. doi:10.1007/s10404-016-1767-5.
Falcucci, Giacomo, Succi, Sauro, Montessori, Andrea, Melchionna, Simone, Prestininzi, Pietro, Barroo, Cedric, Bell, David C., Biener, Monika M., Biener, Juergen, Zugic, Branko, and Kaxiras, Efthimios. 2016. "Mapping reactive flow patterns in monolithic nanoporous catalysts". United States. doi:10.1007/s10404-016-1767-5.
@article{osti_1387937,
title = {Mapping reactive flow patterns in monolithic nanoporous catalysts},
author = {Falcucci, Giacomo and Succi, Sauro and Montessori, Andrea and Melchionna, Simone and Prestininzi, Pietro and Barroo, Cedric and Bell, David C. and Biener, Monika M. and Biener, Juergen and Zugic, Branko and Kaxiras, Efthimios},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1007/s10404-016-1767-5},
journal = {Microfluidics and Nanofluidics},
number = 7,
volume = 20,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
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