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Title: Thermodynamic studies of studtite thermal decomposition pathways via amorphous intermediates UO 3 , U 2 O 7 , and UO 4

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Materials Science of Actinides (MSA)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1387907
DOE Contract Number:
SC0001089
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Nuclear Materials; Journal Volume: 478; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: MSA partners with University of Notre Dame (lead); University of California, Davis; Florida State University; George Washington University; University of Michigan; University of Minnesota; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Oregon state University; Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Savannah River National Laboratory
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
nuclear (including radiation effects), materials and chemistry by design, synthesis (novel materials), synthesis (self-assembly)

Citation Formats

Guo, Xiaofeng, Wu, Di, Xu, Hongwu, Burns, Peter C., and Navrotsky, Alexandra. Thermodynamic studies of studtite thermal decomposition pathways via amorphous intermediates UO 3 , U 2 O 7 , and UO 4. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jnucmat.2016.06.014.
Guo, Xiaofeng, Wu, Di, Xu, Hongwu, Burns, Peter C., & Navrotsky, Alexandra. Thermodynamic studies of studtite thermal decomposition pathways via amorphous intermediates UO 3 , U 2 O 7 , and UO 4. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jnucmat.2016.06.014.
Guo, Xiaofeng, Wu, Di, Xu, Hongwu, Burns, Peter C., and Navrotsky, Alexandra. 2016. "Thermodynamic studies of studtite thermal decomposition pathways via amorphous intermediates UO 3 , U 2 O 7 , and UO 4". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jnucmat.2016.06.014.
@article{osti_1387907,
title = {Thermodynamic studies of studtite thermal decomposition pathways via amorphous intermediates UO 3 , U 2 O 7 , and UO 4},
author = {Guo, Xiaofeng and Wu, Di and Xu, Hongwu and Burns, Peter C. and Navrotsky, Alexandra},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.jnucmat.2016.06.014},
journal = {Journal of Nuclear Materials},
number = C,
volume = 478,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}
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