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Title: Progress in rapid detection and identification of unknown human and agricultural pathogens

Abstract

The medical industry is driving pathogen detection technology from its present characteristics of $50/sample, 100 sample capability systems, with several day time responses, having several percent error rates in reported outcomes. The systems described above are capable of providing samples at < $5/test, managing several million samples, < 1-hour cycle times, (or just minutes in some cases) and < 0.1% error rates. Because of their importance to the medical and agricultural communities, all ''important'' pathogens will have detection kits available (within air transport times, anywhere in the world) by 2020, and the most well known pathogens will have kits available within a few years. Many are available now. Because of the importance of the food supply to modern nations, these technologies will be employed everywhere in this industry. For example, the United States imports 30 B tons of food a year, but inspects < 1%. Portable inspection systems will make it possible to test for dangerous pathogens in feed lots, food processing plants, markets, and points of use. Outbreaks of animal or plant disease will be immediately detectable using field instrumentation, and more complex samples can be sent to central testing laboratories where more sophisticated test systems will be available.more » Unusual pathogens either naturally or purposefully selected or developed, will require special attention because there is not a commercial economic driver for the development of detection systems and curative agents. Their development, and production for sufficient availability, will require significant investments by the world community. The strategy and costs for developing vaccines or curative drugs will be very expensive and will need special attention. However it is important that attention be directed to these problems because such attention has a strong deterrent effect on potential developers or users. The capacity to use the full information content contained in pathogen systems, such as their full genomic information, can be very helpful in identifying malevolent users. In addition, it is undoubtedly true that an understanding of replication and human or other sensitivity to pathogens will improve our medical understanding of human health in general.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Defense Programs (DP) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
13855
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JC-135368; YN0100000
YN0100000; TRN: AH200135%%551
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 24th Session of the International Seminars on Planetary Emergencies, Erice, Sicily (IT), 08/19/1999--08/24/1999; Other Information: PBD: 13 Aug 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; AIR TRANSPORT; ECONOMICS; DETECTION; FOOD PROCESSING; PATHOGENS; PLANT DISEASES; SENSITIVITY; VACCINES

Citation Formats

Barnes, T, Holzrichter, J F, and Milanovich, F P. Progress in rapid detection and identification of unknown human and agricultural pathogens. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Barnes, T, Holzrichter, J F, & Milanovich, F P. Progress in rapid detection and identification of unknown human and agricultural pathogens. United States.
Barnes, T, Holzrichter, J F, and Milanovich, F P. Fri . "Progress in rapid detection and identification of unknown human and agricultural pathogens". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/13855.
@article{osti_13855,
title = {Progress in rapid detection and identification of unknown human and agricultural pathogens},
author = {Barnes, T and Holzrichter, J F and Milanovich, F P},
abstractNote = {The medical industry is driving pathogen detection technology from its present characteristics of $50/sample, 100 sample capability systems, with several day time responses, having several percent error rates in reported outcomes. The systems described above are capable of providing samples at < $5/test, managing several million samples, < 1-hour cycle times, (or just minutes in some cases) and < 0.1% error rates. Because of their importance to the medical and agricultural communities, all ''important'' pathogens will have detection kits available (within air transport times, anywhere in the world) by 2020, and the most well known pathogens will have kits available within a few years. Many are available now. Because of the importance of the food supply to modern nations, these technologies will be employed everywhere in this industry. For example, the United States imports 30 B tons of food a year, but inspects < 1%. Portable inspection systems will make it possible to test for dangerous pathogens in feed lots, food processing plants, markets, and points of use. Outbreaks of animal or plant disease will be immediately detectable using field instrumentation, and more complex samples can be sent to central testing laboratories where more sophisticated test systems will be available. Unusual pathogens either naturally or purposefully selected or developed, will require special attention because there is not a commercial economic driver for the development of detection systems and curative agents. Their development, and production for sufficient availability, will require significant investments by the world community. The strategy and costs for developing vaccines or curative drugs will be very expensive and will need special attention. However it is important that attention be directed to these problems because such attention has a strong deterrent effect on potential developers or users. The capacity to use the full information content contained in pathogen systems, such as their full genomic information, can be very helpful in identifying malevolent users. In addition, it is undoubtedly true that an understanding of replication and human or other sensitivity to pathogens will improve our medical understanding of human health in general.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {8}
}

Conference:
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