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Title: FTIR measurements of mid-IR absorption spectra of gaseous fatty acid methyl esters at T=25–500°C

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center (CEFRC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1384026
DOE Contract Number:
SC0001198
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer; Journal Volume: 145; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CEFRC partners with Princeton University (lead); Argonne National Laboratory; University of Connecticut; Cornell University; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; University of Minnesota; Sandia National Laboratories; University of Southern California; Stanford University; University of Wisconsin, Madison
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
biofuels (including algae and biomass), hydrogen and fuel cells, combustion, carbon capture

Citation Formats

Campbell, M. F., Freeman, K. G., Davidson, D. F., and Hanson, R. K. FTIR measurements of mid-IR absorption spectra of gaseous fatty acid methyl esters at T=25–500°C. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jqsrt.2014.04.017.
Campbell, M. F., Freeman, K. G., Davidson, D. F., & Hanson, R. K. FTIR measurements of mid-IR absorption spectra of gaseous fatty acid methyl esters at T=25–500°C. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jqsrt.2014.04.017.
Campbell, M. F., Freeman, K. G., Davidson, D. F., and Hanson, R. K. Mon . "FTIR measurements of mid-IR absorption spectra of gaseous fatty acid methyl esters at T=25–500°C". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jqsrt.2014.04.017.
@article{osti_1384026,
title = {FTIR measurements of mid-IR absorption spectra of gaseous fatty acid methyl esters at T=25–500°C},
author = {Campbell, M. F. and Freeman, K. G. and Davidson, D. F. and Hanson, R. K.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.jqsrt.2014.04.017},
journal = {Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer},
number = C,
volume = 145,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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