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Title: EARLY-Phase Health Effects.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1380181
Report Number(s):
SAND2016-8598PE
647091
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the 2016 MACCS Users' Workship held September 12-14, 2016 in Bethesda, MD.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Bixler, Nathan E. EARLY-Phase Health Effects.. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Bixler, Nathan E. EARLY-Phase Health Effects.. United States.
Bixler, Nathan E. 2016. "EARLY-Phase Health Effects.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1380181.
@article{osti_1380181,
title = {EARLY-Phase Health Effects.},
author = {Bixler, Nathan E.},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Conference:
Other availability
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