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Title: STOCHASTIC EFFECTS FROM CLASSICAL 3D SYNCHROTRON RADIATION

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1380161
Report Number(s):
SLAC-PUB-17141
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Program Document
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

None. STOCHASTIC EFFECTS FROM CLASSICAL 3D SYNCHROTRON RADIATION. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
None. STOCHASTIC EFFECTS FROM CLASSICAL 3D SYNCHROTRON RADIATION. United States.
None. 2017. "STOCHASTIC EFFECTS FROM CLASSICAL 3D SYNCHROTRON RADIATION". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1380161.
@article{osti_1380161,
title = {STOCHASTIC EFFECTS FROM CLASSICAL 3D SYNCHROTRON RADIATION},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

Program Document:
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