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Title: Radionuclide migration as a function of mineralogy

Abstract

The migration of radionuclides is studied as a function of mineralogy utilizing batch sorption and column experiments. The transport behavior of alkaline, alkaline-earth, and transition metals, and actinide species is studied in pure mineral separates. The solid phases utilized for these investigations are silicates, alumino-silicates, carbonates, and metal oxides and oxyhydroxides. The results of this effort are utilized to aid in the elucidation of the dominant chemical mechanisms of radionuclide migration, the prediction of radionuclide transport in conditions similar to those expected at the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and the identification of materials that act as natural geological barriers or that can be utilized as strong sorbers in engineered barriers. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
138004
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-91-113; CONF-910435-45
ON: DE91007385; TRN: 91:004784
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2. annual American Nuclear Society (ANS) international high level radioactive waste management conference, Las Vegas, NV (United States), 28 Apr - 3 May 1991; Other Information: PBD: [1991]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
05 NUCLEAR FUELS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; UNDERGROUND DISPOSAL; MINERALS; SORPTIVE PROPERTIES; QUARTZ; RADIONUCLIDE MIGRATION; FELDSPARS; CLINOPTILOLITE; MONTMORILLONITE; CALCITE; HEMATITE; HOLLANDITE; MANGANESE HYDROXIDES; OXIDE MINERALS; SORPTION; EXTRACTION COLUMNS; STRONTIUM 85; BARIUM 133; CESIUM 137; MINERALOGY; PERTECHNETATES; NEPTUNIUM 237; PLUTONIUM 239; AMERICIUM 241; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; FORECASTING; GROUND WATER; CRISTOBALITE; Yucca Mountain Project

Citation Formats

Triay, I.R., Mitchell, A.J., and Ott, M.A. Radionuclide migration as a function of mineralogy. United States: N. p., 1991. Web.
Triay, I.R., Mitchell, A.J., & Ott, M.A. Radionuclide migration as a function of mineralogy. United States.
Triay, I.R., Mitchell, A.J., and Ott, M.A. 1991. "Radionuclide migration as a function of mineralogy". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/138004.
@article{osti_138004,
title = {Radionuclide migration as a function of mineralogy},
author = {Triay, I.R. and Mitchell, A.J. and Ott, M.A.},
abstractNote = {The migration of radionuclides is studied as a function of mineralogy utilizing batch sorption and column experiments. The transport behavior of alkaline, alkaline-earth, and transition metals, and actinide species is studied in pure mineral separates. The solid phases utilized for these investigations are silicates, alumino-silicates, carbonates, and metal oxides and oxyhydroxides. The results of this effort are utilized to aid in the elucidation of the dominant chemical mechanisms of radionuclide migration, the prediction of radionuclide transport in conditions similar to those expected at the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and the identification of materials that act as natural geological barriers or that can be utilized as strong sorbers in engineered barriers. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1991,
month = 2
}

Conference:
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  • The migration of radionuclides is studied as a function of mineralogy utilizing batch sorption and column experiments. The transport behavior of alkaline, alkaline-earth, and transition metals and actinide species is studied in pure mineral separates. The solid phases utilized for these investigations are silicates, alumino-silicates, carbonates, and metal oxides and oxyhydroxides. The results of this effort are utilized to aid in the elucidation of the dominant chemical mechanisms of radionuclide migration; the prediction of radionuclide transport in conditions similar to those expected at the candidate high-level nuclear waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; and the identification of materials thatmore » act as natural geological barriers or that can be utilized as strong sorbers in engineered barriers.« less
  • The reduction of structural Fe in smectite may be mediated either abiotically by reaction with chemical reducing agents or biotically by reaction with various bacterial species. The effects of abiotic reduction on clay surface chemistry are much better known than the effects of biotic reduction, and differences between them are still in need of investigation. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of dithionite (abiotic) and bacteria (biotic) reduction of structural Fe in nontronite on the clay structure as observed by variable-temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy. Biotic reduction was accomplished by incubating Na-saturated Garfield nontronite (sample API 33a)more » with« less
  • Concentrations and isotope ratios of natural decay series radionuclides have been studied in three contrasting crystalline rock drill core sections intersecting water-conducting fractures deep in the bedrock. Radioactive disequilibria resulting from rock-water interactions were observed in two of the cores. These indicated uranium migration along distances of 40 cm or more on a timescale of 10/sup 6/ years in conjunction with thorium immobility under the same conditions. Fracture surface minerals showed a high affinity for radionuclide retardation and a limit of about 3 cm is suggested for the migration of radionuclides from fracture fluids into the saturated rock. This limitmore » may correspond to enhanced matrix porosities resulting from earlier hydrothermal activity along the same channels.« less
  • Five thermal-convection loops, constructed of granite, were operated for 350 d with a hot-side temperature of 60/sup 0/C and a cold-site temperature of 20/sup 0/C, to examine the effects of a thermal gradient on the convective transport of seven radionuclides. Radionuclide concentrations on the surface of the loop flow channels indicated that /sup 125/Sb, /sup 60/Co and /sup 54/Mn and precipitated iron oxyhydroxides were concentrated in the hot side of the loops. Concentrations of /sup 144/Ce and /sup 99/Tc were higher in the cold side of the loops. Concentrations of /sup 144/Ce and /sup 99/Tc were higher in the coldmore » side of the loops. Both of these patterns were exhibited by /sup 75/Se. The concentration of /sup 137/Cs was not significantly affected by the thermal gradient. Radionuclide solubility and sorption were affected by variations in pH, Eh and ionic strength. Incorporation of the radionuclide into mineral lattices was found to play a key role in retarding the transport of all radionuclides tested.« less