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Title: Shocked chromites in fossil L chondrites: A Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy study

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [5];  [6]
  1. Robert A. Pritzker Center for Meteoritics and Polar Studies, The Field Museum of Natural History, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive Chicago Illinois 60605 USA, Chicago Center for Cosmochemistry, The University of Chicago, 5734 South Ellis Avenue Chicago Illinois 60637 USA
  2. Robert A. Pritzker Center for Meteoritics and Polar Studies, The Field Museum of Natural History, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive Chicago Illinois 60605 USA, Chicago Center for Cosmochemistry, The University of Chicago, 5734 South Ellis Avenue Chicago Illinois 60637 USA, Department of the Geophysical Sciences, The University of Chicago, 5734 South Ellis Avenue Chicago Illinois 60637 USA
  3. Photon Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne Illinois 60439 USA
  4. Bayerisches Geoinstitut, University of Bayreuth, Universitätsstraβe 30 95447 Bayreuth Germany
  5. Electron and X-ray Microscopy, Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne Illinois 60439 USA
  6. Robert A. Pritzker Center for Meteoritics and Polar Studies, The Field Museum of Natural History, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive Chicago Illinois 60605 USA, Astrogeobiology Laboratory, Department of Physics, Lund University, SE 22100 Lund Sweden
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1379985
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357; NSF NNCI-1542205; NSF DMR-1121262
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Meteoritics and Planetary Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 52; Journal Issue: 9; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 16:49:46; Journal ID: ISSN 1086-9379
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Rout, Surya S., Heck, Philipp R., Zaluzec, Nestor J., Ishii, Takayuki, Wen, Jianguo, Miller, Dean J., and Schmitz, Birger. Shocked chromites in fossil L chondrites: A Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy study. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1111/maps.12887.
Rout, Surya S., Heck, Philipp R., Zaluzec, Nestor J., Ishii, Takayuki, Wen, Jianguo, Miller, Dean J., & Schmitz, Birger. Shocked chromites in fossil L chondrites: A Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy study. United States. doi:10.1111/maps.12887.
Rout, Surya S., Heck, Philipp R., Zaluzec, Nestor J., Ishii, Takayuki, Wen, Jianguo, Miller, Dean J., and Schmitz, Birger. Tue . "Shocked chromites in fossil L chondrites: A Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy study". United States. doi:10.1111/maps.12887.
@article{osti_1379985,
title = {Shocked chromites in fossil L chondrites: A Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy study},
author = {Rout, Surya S. and Heck, Philipp R. and Zaluzec, Nestor J. and Ishii, Takayuki and Wen, Jianguo and Miller, Dean J. and Schmitz, Birger},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1111/maps.12887},
journal = {Meteoritics and Planetary Science},
number = 9,
volume = 52,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 02 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue May 02 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1111/maps.12887

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  • This communication presents a comparative study of polish-induced effects in {l angle}100{r angle} GaAs by Raman spectroscopy (strain) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (dislocation density). It is found that the depth and polish-time dependence of both the strain and dislocation density obey the same relationship. However, the skin depth evaluated by Raman scattering is a factor of 10 smaller than that determined from transmission electron microscopy.
  • Structural evolution of WO{sub x} species on the surface of titania nanotubes was followed by in situ thermo-Raman spectroscopy. A total of 15 wt% of W atoms were loaded on the surface of a hydroxylated titania nanotubes by impregnation with ammonium metatungstate solution and then, the sample was thermally treated in a Linkam cell at different temperatures in nitrogen flow. The band characteristic of the W=O bond was observed at 962 cm{sup -1} in the dried sample, which vanished between 300 and 700 deg. C, and reappear again after annealing at 800 deg. C, along with a broad band centeredmore » at 935 cm{sup -1}, attributed to the v{sub 1} vibration of W=O in tetrahedral coordination. At 900 and 1000 deg. C, the broad band decomposed into four bands at 923, 934, 940 and 950 cm{sup -1}, corresponding to the symmetric and asymmetric vibration of W=O bonds in Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}W{sub 2}O{sub 7} phases as determined by X-ray diffraction and High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The structure of the nanotubular support was kept at temperatures below 450 deg. C, thereafter, it transformed into anatase being stabilized at temperatures as high as 900 deg. C. At 1000 deg. C, anatase phase partially converted into rutile. After annealing at 1000 deg. C, a core-shell model material was obtained, with a shell of ca. 5 nm thickness, composed of sodium tungstate nanoclusters, and a core composed mainly of rutile TiO{sub 2} phase. - Graphical abstract: Titania nanotubes loaded with 15 wt% W atoms were characterized from room temperature (rt) to 1000 deg. C by thermo-Raman spectroscopy in N{sub 2}. At 1000 deg. C, a core-shell model material was obtained, with a shell thickness of ca. 5 nm composed by nanoclusters of sodium tungstate, and a core composed mainly of rutile TiO{sub 2} phase.« less
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