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Title: A Plastic-Crystal Electrolyte Interphase for All-Solid-State Sodium Batteries

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Texas Materials Institute, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin TX 78712 USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1379982
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0005397
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Angewandte Chemie
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 129; Journal Issue: 20; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-09-07 08:50:01; Journal ID: ISSN 0044-8249
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
Germany
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Gao, Hongcai, Xue, Leigang, Xin, Sen, Park, Kyusung, and Goodenough, John B. A Plastic-Crystal Electrolyte Interphase for All-Solid-State Sodium Batteries. Germany: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/ange.201702003.
Gao, Hongcai, Xue, Leigang, Xin, Sen, Park, Kyusung, & Goodenough, John B. A Plastic-Crystal Electrolyte Interphase for All-Solid-State Sodium Batteries. Germany. doi:10.1002/ange.201702003.
Gao, Hongcai, Xue, Leigang, Xin, Sen, Park, Kyusung, and Goodenough, John B. Wed . "A Plastic-Crystal Electrolyte Interphase for All-Solid-State Sodium Batteries". Germany. doi:10.1002/ange.201702003.
@article{osti_1379982,
title = {A Plastic-Crystal Electrolyte Interphase for All-Solid-State Sodium Batteries},
author = {Gao, Hongcai and Xue, Leigang and Xin, Sen and Park, Kyusung and Goodenough, John B.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/ange.201702003},
journal = {Angewandte Chemie},
number = 20,
volume = 129,
place = {Germany},
year = {Wed Apr 12 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Apr 12 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1002/ange.201702003

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