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Title: Real-time Crystal Growth Visualization and Quantification by Energy-Resolved Neutron Imaging

Abstract

Energy-resolved neutron imaging is investigated as a real-time diagnostic tool for visualization and in-situ measurements of "blind" processes. This technique is demonstrated for the Bridgman-type crystal growth enabling remote and direct measurements of growth parameters crucial for process optimization. The location and shape of the interface between liquid and solid phases are monitored in real-time, concurrently with the measurement of elemental distribution within the growth volume and with the identification of structural features with a ~100 μm spatial resolution. Such diagnostics can substantially reduce the development time between exploratory small scale growth of new materials and their subsequent commercial production. This technique is widely applicable and is not limited to crystal growth processes.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [2];  [2]
  1. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Space Sciences Lab.
  2. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  3. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1379812
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; imaging techniques; sensors and biosensors

Citation Formats

Tremsin, Anton S., Perrodin, Didier, Losko, Adrian S., Vogel, Sven C., Bourke, Mark A. M., Bizarri, Gregory A., and Bourret, Edith D. Real-time Crystal Growth Visualization and Quantification by Energy-Resolved Neutron Imaging. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1038/srep46275.
Tremsin, Anton S., Perrodin, Didier, Losko, Adrian S., Vogel, Sven C., Bourke, Mark A. M., Bizarri, Gregory A., & Bourret, Edith D. Real-time Crystal Growth Visualization and Quantification by Energy-Resolved Neutron Imaging. United States. doi:10.1038/srep46275.
Tremsin, Anton S., Perrodin, Didier, Losko, Adrian S., Vogel, Sven C., Bourke, Mark A. M., Bizarri, Gregory A., and Bourret, Edith D. 2017. "Real-time Crystal Growth Visualization and Quantification by Energy-Resolved Neutron Imaging". United States. doi:10.1038/srep46275. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1379812.
@article{osti_1379812,
title = {Real-time Crystal Growth Visualization and Quantification by Energy-Resolved Neutron Imaging},
author = {Tremsin, Anton S. and Perrodin, Didier and Losko, Adrian S. and Vogel, Sven C. and Bourke, Mark A. M. and Bizarri, Gregory A. and Bourret, Edith D.},
abstractNote = {Energy-resolved neutron imaging is investigated as a real-time diagnostic tool for visualization and in-situ measurements of "blind" processes. This technique is demonstrated for the Bridgman-type crystal growth enabling remote and direct measurements of growth parameters crucial for process optimization. The location and shape of the interface between liquid and solid phases are monitored in real-time, concurrently with the measurement of elemental distribution within the growth volume and with the identification of structural features with a ~100 μm spatial resolution. Such diagnostics can substantially reduce the development time between exploratory small scale growth of new materials and their subsequent commercial production. This technique is widely applicable and is not limited to crystal growth processes.},
doi = {10.1038/srep46275},
journal = {Scientific Reports},
number = ,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 4
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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