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Title: Early exposure to thirdhand cigarette smoke affects body mass and the development of immunity in mice

Abstract

Thirdhand smoke (THS) is the fraction of cigarette smoke that persists in indoor environments after smoking. We investigated the effects of neonatal and adult THS exposure on bodyweight and blood cell populations in C57BL/6 J mice. At the end of neonatal exposure, THS-treated male and female mice had significantly lower bodyweight than their respective control mice. However, five weeks after neonatal exposure ended, THS-treated mice weighed the same as controls. In contrast, adult THS exposure did not change bodyweight of mice. On the other hand, both neonatal and adult THS exposure had profound effects on the hematopoietic system. Fourteen weeks after neonatal THS exposure ended, eosinophil number and platelet volume were significantly higher, while hematocrit, mean cell volume, and platelet counts were significantly lower compared to control. Similarly, adult THS exposure also decreased platelet counts and increased neutrophil counts. Moreover, both neonatal and adult THS exposure caused a significant increase in percentage of B-cells and significantly decreased percentage of myeloid cells. Our results demonstrate that neonatal THS exposure decreases bodyweight and that THS exposure induces persistent changes in the hematopoietic system independent of age at exposure. These results also suggest that THS exposure may have adverse effects on human health.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [5];  [5];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Biological Systems and Engineering Division
  2. Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
  3. Nanjing Medical Univ. (China). Dept. of Gastroenterology
  4. Nanjing Medical Univ. (China). Inst. of Toxicology
  5. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1379722
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; disease model; risk factors

Citation Formats

Hang, Bo, Snijders, Antoine M., Huang, Yurong, Schick, Suzaynn F., Wang, Pin, Xia, Yankai, Havel, Christopher, Jacob, Peyton, Benowitz, Neal, Destaillats, Hugo, Gundel, Lara A., and Mao, Jian-Hua. Early exposure to thirdhand cigarette smoke affects body mass and the development of immunity in mice. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1038/srep41915.
Hang, Bo, Snijders, Antoine M., Huang, Yurong, Schick, Suzaynn F., Wang, Pin, Xia, Yankai, Havel, Christopher, Jacob, Peyton, Benowitz, Neal, Destaillats, Hugo, Gundel, Lara A., & Mao, Jian-Hua. Early exposure to thirdhand cigarette smoke affects body mass and the development of immunity in mice. United States. doi:10.1038/srep41915.
Hang, Bo, Snijders, Antoine M., Huang, Yurong, Schick, Suzaynn F., Wang, Pin, Xia, Yankai, Havel, Christopher, Jacob, Peyton, Benowitz, Neal, Destaillats, Hugo, Gundel, Lara A., and Mao, Jian-Hua. Fri . "Early exposure to thirdhand cigarette smoke affects body mass and the development of immunity in mice". United States. doi:10.1038/srep41915. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1379722.
@article{osti_1379722,
title = {Early exposure to thirdhand cigarette smoke affects body mass and the development of immunity in mice},
author = {Hang, Bo and Snijders, Antoine M. and Huang, Yurong and Schick, Suzaynn F. and Wang, Pin and Xia, Yankai and Havel, Christopher and Jacob, Peyton and Benowitz, Neal and Destaillats, Hugo and Gundel, Lara A. and Mao, Jian-Hua},
abstractNote = {Thirdhand smoke (THS) is the fraction of cigarette smoke that persists in indoor environments after smoking. We investigated the effects of neonatal and adult THS exposure on bodyweight and blood cell populations in C57BL/6 J mice. At the end of neonatal exposure, THS-treated male and female mice had significantly lower bodyweight than their respective control mice. However, five weeks after neonatal exposure ended, THS-treated mice weighed the same as controls. In contrast, adult THS exposure did not change bodyweight of mice. On the other hand, both neonatal and adult THS exposure had profound effects on the hematopoietic system. Fourteen weeks after neonatal THS exposure ended, eosinophil number and platelet volume were significantly higher, while hematocrit, mean cell volume, and platelet counts were significantly lower compared to control. Similarly, adult THS exposure also decreased platelet counts and increased neutrophil counts. Moreover, both neonatal and adult THS exposure caused a significant increase in percentage of B-cells and significantly decreased percentage of myeloid cells. Our results demonstrate that neonatal THS exposure decreases bodyweight and that THS exposure induces persistent changes in the hematopoietic system independent of age at exposure. These results also suggest that THS exposure may have adverse effects on human health.},
doi = {10.1038/srep41915},
journal = {Scientific Reports},
number = ,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 03 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Feb 03 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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  • It is well recognized that cigarette smoking in pregnant women exerts many deleterious effects on their progenies; intrauterine growth retardation, and increases in perinatal mortality and premature births. The fetal growth retardation also has been reported in animals exposed to cigarette smoke. The authors previously demonstrated that cigarette smoke exposure in pregnant rats retarded the growth of fetuses from mid to late stages of pregnancy. In addition, the weight of uteri containing embryos in animals inhaling the smoke was smaller, although not significant, than that in the control on day 7 of pregnancy. Based on these findings, it was suggestedmore » that the growth of embryos in early stage seemed to be harmfully affected as well as during mid and late stages of pregnancy. However, since the uterine weight in early pregnancy was measured in the previous study instead of the direct observation of early stage embryos, it remained unclear whether the early development of embryos was really influenced by cigarette smoke exposure or not. The present study was designed to observe the effects of cigarette smoke inhalation by pregnant rats on early development of embryos from fertilization to implantation.« less
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