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Title: Real-Time Charging Strategies for an Electric Vehicle Aggregator to Provide Ancillary Services

Abstract

Real-time charging strategies, in the context of vehicle to grid (V2G) technology, are needed to enable the use of electric vehicle (EV) fleets batteries to provide ancillary services (AS). Here, we develop tools to manage charging and discharging in a fleet to track an Automatic Generation Control (AGC) signal when aggregated. We also propose a real-time controller that considers bidirectional charging efficiency and extend it to study the effect of looking ahead when implementing Model Predictive Control (MPC). Simulations show that the controller improves tracking error as compared with benchmark scheduling algorithms, as well as regulation capacity and battery cycling.

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Pontifical Catholic Univ. of Chile, Santiago (Chile)
  2. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  3. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1379631
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2017; Journal ID: ISSN 1949-3053
Publisher:
IEEE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; electric vehicles; resource scheduling; ancillary services; vehicle to grid

Citation Formats

Wenzel, George, Negrete-Pincetic, Matias, Olivares, Daniel E., MacDonald, Jason, and Callaway, Duncan S. Real-Time Charging Strategies for an Electric Vehicle Aggregator to Provide Ancillary Services. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1109/TSG.2017.2681961.
Wenzel, George, Negrete-Pincetic, Matias, Olivares, Daniel E., MacDonald, Jason, & Callaway, Duncan S. Real-Time Charging Strategies for an Electric Vehicle Aggregator to Provide Ancillary Services. United States. doi:10.1109/TSG.2017.2681961.
Wenzel, George, Negrete-Pincetic, Matias, Olivares, Daniel E., MacDonald, Jason, and Callaway, Duncan S. Mon . "Real-Time Charging Strategies for an Electric Vehicle Aggregator to Provide Ancillary Services". United States. doi:10.1109/TSG.2017.2681961. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1379631.
@article{osti_1379631,
title = {Real-Time Charging Strategies for an Electric Vehicle Aggregator to Provide Ancillary Services},
author = {Wenzel, George and Negrete-Pincetic, Matias and Olivares, Daniel E. and MacDonald, Jason and Callaway, Duncan S.},
abstractNote = {Real-time charging strategies, in the context of vehicle to grid (V2G) technology, are needed to enable the use of electric vehicle (EV) fleets batteries to provide ancillary services (AS). Here, we develop tools to manage charging and discharging in a fleet to track an Automatic Generation Control (AGC) signal when aggregated. We also propose a real-time controller that considers bidirectional charging efficiency and extend it to study the effect of looking ahead when implementing Model Predictive Control (MPC). Simulations show that the controller improves tracking error as compared with benchmark scheduling algorithms, as well as regulation capacity and battery cycling.},
doi = {10.1109/TSG.2017.2681961},
journal = {IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid},
number = ,
volume = 2017,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 13 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Mar 13 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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