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Title: From dots to doughnuts: Two-dimensionally confined deposition of polyelectrolytes on block copolymer templates

Abstract

The combination of block copolymer templating with electrostatic self-assembly provides a simple and robust method for creating nano-patterned polyelectrolyte multilayers over large areas. The deposition of the first polyelectrolyte layer provides important insights on the initial stages of multilayer buildup. Here, we focus on two-dimensionally confined “dots” patterns afforded by block copolymer films featuring hexagonally-packed cylinders that are oriented normal to the substrate. Rendering the cylinder caps positively charged enables the selective deposition of negatively charged polyelectrolytes on them under salt-free conditions. The initially formed polyelectrolyte nanostructures adopt a toroidal (“doughnut”) shape, which results from retraction of dangling polyelectrolyte segments into the “dots” upon drying. With increasing exposure time to the polyelectrolyte solution, the final shape of the deposited polyelectrolyte transitions from a doughnut to a hemisphere. In conclusion, these insights would enable the creation of patterned polyelectrolyte multilayers with increased control over adsorption selectivity of the additional incoming polyelectrolytes.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel). Inst. of Chemistry and the Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
  2. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Division
  3. Johannes Gutenberg Univ., Mainz (Germany). Inst. of Organic Chemistry
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1379617
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Polymer
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 107; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0032-3861
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Block copolymers; Layer-by-layer deposition; Patterning; Polyelectrolytes; Self-assembly

Citation Formats

Oded, Meirav, Kelly, Stephen T., Gilles, Mary K., Müller, Axel H. E., and Shenhar, Roy. From dots to doughnuts: Two-dimensionally confined deposition of polyelectrolytes on block copolymer templates. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.polymer.2016.07.016.
Oded, Meirav, Kelly, Stephen T., Gilles, Mary K., Müller, Axel H. E., & Shenhar, Roy. From dots to doughnuts: Two-dimensionally confined deposition of polyelectrolytes on block copolymer templates. United States. doi:10.1016/j.polymer.2016.07.016.
Oded, Meirav, Kelly, Stephen T., Gilles, Mary K., Müller, Axel H. E., and Shenhar, Roy. 2016. "From dots to doughnuts: Two-dimensionally confined deposition of polyelectrolytes on block copolymer templates". United States. doi:10.1016/j.polymer.2016.07.016. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1379617.
@article{osti_1379617,
title = {From dots to doughnuts: Two-dimensionally confined deposition of polyelectrolytes on block copolymer templates},
author = {Oded, Meirav and Kelly, Stephen T. and Gilles, Mary K. and Müller, Axel H. E. and Shenhar, Roy},
abstractNote = {The combination of block copolymer templating with electrostatic self-assembly provides a simple and robust method for creating nano-patterned polyelectrolyte multilayers over large areas. The deposition of the first polyelectrolyte layer provides important insights on the initial stages of multilayer buildup. Here, we focus on two-dimensionally confined “dots” patterns afforded by block copolymer films featuring hexagonally-packed cylinders that are oriented normal to the substrate. Rendering the cylinder caps positively charged enables the selective deposition of negatively charged polyelectrolytes on them under salt-free conditions. The initially formed polyelectrolyte nanostructures adopt a toroidal (“doughnut”) shape, which results from retraction of dangling polyelectrolyte segments into the “dots” upon drying. With increasing exposure time to the polyelectrolyte solution, the final shape of the deposited polyelectrolyte transitions from a doughnut to a hemisphere. In conclusion, these insights would enable the creation of patterned polyelectrolyte multilayers with increased control over adsorption selectivity of the additional incoming polyelectrolytes.},
doi = {10.1016/j.polymer.2016.07.016},
journal = {Polymer},
number = C,
volume = 107,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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