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Title: SAR11 bacteria linked to ocean anoxia and nitrogen loss

Abstract

Bacteria of the SAR11 clade constitute up to one half of all microbial cells in the oxygen-rich surface ocean. SAR11 bacteria are also abundant in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), where oxygen falls below detection and anaerobic microbes have vital roles in converting bioavailable nitrogen to N 2 gas. Anaerobic metabolism has not yet been observed in SAR11, and it remains unknown how these bacteria contribute to OMZ biogeochemical cycling. Here in this paper, genomic analysis of single cells from the world's largest OMZ revealed previously uncharacterized SAR11 lineages with adaptations for life without oxygen, including genes for respiratory nitrate reductases (Nar). SAR11 nar genes were experimentally verified to encode proteins catalysing the nitrite-producing first step of denitrification and constituted ~40% of OMZ nar transcripts, with transcription peaking in the anoxic zone of maximum nitrate reduction activity. Finally, these results link SAR11 to pathways of ocean nitrogen loss, redefining the ecological niche of Earth's most abundant organismal group.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [6];  [3];  [8];  [2]
  1. Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering
  2. Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Biological Sciences
  3. USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States)
  4. Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME (United States). Dept. of Biology
  5. Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology (Germany). Biochemistry Group
  6. University of Southern Denmark (Denmark). Department of Biology and Nordic Center for Earth Evolution (NordCEE)
  7. Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
  8. Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering and School of Biological Sciences
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1379554
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature (London)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Nature (London); Journal Volume: 536; Journal Issue: 7615; Journal ID: ISSN 0028-0836
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Water microbiology; Element cycles; Marine biology

Citation Formats

Tsementzi, Despina, Wu, Jieying, Deutsch, Samuel, Nath, Sangeeta, Rodriguez-R, Luis M., Burns, Andrew S., Ranjan, Piyush, Sarode, Neha, Malmstrom, Rex R., Padilla, Cory C., Stone, Benjamin K., Bristow, Laura A., Larsen, Morten, Glass, Jennifer B., Thamdrup, Bo, Woyke, Tanja, Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T., and Stewart, Frank J.. SAR11 bacteria linked to ocean anoxia and nitrogen loss. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1038/nature19068.
Tsementzi, Despina, Wu, Jieying, Deutsch, Samuel, Nath, Sangeeta, Rodriguez-R, Luis M., Burns, Andrew S., Ranjan, Piyush, Sarode, Neha, Malmstrom, Rex R., Padilla, Cory C., Stone, Benjamin K., Bristow, Laura A., Larsen, Morten, Glass, Jennifer B., Thamdrup, Bo, Woyke, Tanja, Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T., & Stewart, Frank J.. SAR11 bacteria linked to ocean anoxia and nitrogen loss. United States. doi:10.1038/nature19068.
Tsementzi, Despina, Wu, Jieying, Deutsch, Samuel, Nath, Sangeeta, Rodriguez-R, Luis M., Burns, Andrew S., Ranjan, Piyush, Sarode, Neha, Malmstrom, Rex R., Padilla, Cory C., Stone, Benjamin K., Bristow, Laura A., Larsen, Morten, Glass, Jennifer B., Thamdrup, Bo, Woyke, Tanja, Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T., and Stewart, Frank J.. Wed . "SAR11 bacteria linked to ocean anoxia and nitrogen loss". United States. doi:10.1038/nature19068. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1379554.
@article{osti_1379554,
title = {SAR11 bacteria linked to ocean anoxia and nitrogen loss},
author = {Tsementzi, Despina and Wu, Jieying and Deutsch, Samuel and Nath, Sangeeta and Rodriguez-R, Luis M. and Burns, Andrew S. and Ranjan, Piyush and Sarode, Neha and Malmstrom, Rex R. and Padilla, Cory C. and Stone, Benjamin K. and Bristow, Laura A. and Larsen, Morten and Glass, Jennifer B. and Thamdrup, Bo and Woyke, Tanja and Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T. and Stewart, Frank J.},
abstractNote = {Bacteria of the SAR11 clade constitute up to one half of all microbial cells in the oxygen-rich surface ocean. SAR11 bacteria are also abundant in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), where oxygen falls below detection and anaerobic microbes have vital roles in converting bioavailable nitrogen to N2 gas. Anaerobic metabolism has not yet been observed in SAR11, and it remains unknown how these bacteria contribute to OMZ biogeochemical cycling. Here in this paper, genomic analysis of single cells from the world's largest OMZ revealed previously uncharacterized SAR11 lineages with adaptations for life without oxygen, including genes for respiratory nitrate reductases (Nar). SAR11 nar genes were experimentally verified to encode proteins catalysing the nitrite-producing first step of denitrification and constituted ~40% of OMZ nar transcripts, with transcription peaking in the anoxic zone of maximum nitrate reduction activity. Finally, these results link SAR11 to pathways of ocean nitrogen loss, redefining the ecological niche of Earth's most abundant organismal group.},
doi = {10.1038/nature19068},
journal = {Nature (London)},
number = 7615,
volume = 536,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Aug 03 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Aug 03 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

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