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Title: Real-time microstructure imaging by Laue microdiffraction: A sample application in laser 3D printed Ni-based superalloys

Abstract

Synchrotron-based Laue microdiffraction has been widely applied to characterize the local crystal structure, orientation, and defects of inhomogeneous polycrystalline solids by raster scanning them under a micro/nano focused polychromatic X-ray probe. In a typical experiment, a large number of Laue diffraction patterns are collected, requiring novel data reduction and analysis approaches, especially for researchers who do not have access to fast parallel computing capabilities. In this article, a novel approach is developed by plotting the distributions of the average recorded intensity and the average filtered intensity of the Laue patterns. Visualization of the characteristic microstructural features is realized in real time during data collection. As an example, this method is applied to image key features such as microcracks, carbides, heat affected zone, and dendrites in a laser assisted 3D printed Ni-based superalloy, at a speed much faster than data collection. Such analytical approach remains valid for a wide range of crystalline solids, and therefore extends the application range of the Laue microdiffraction technique to problems where real-time decision-making during experiment is crucial (for instance time-resolved non-reversible experiments).

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [1]
  1. Xi'an Jiaotong Univ (China). Center for Advanced Materials Performance from the Nanoscale (CAMP-Nano)
  2. Xi'an Jiaotong Univ. (China). State Key Lab. for Manufacturing Systems Engineering
  3. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1379400
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; characterization and analytical techniques; imaging techniques; metals and alloys

Citation Formats

Zhou, Guangni, Zhu, Wenxin, Shen, Hao, Li, Yao, Zhang, Anfeng, Tamura, Nobumichi, and Chen, Kai. Real-time microstructure imaging by Laue microdiffraction: A sample application in laser 3D printed Ni-based superalloys. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1038/srep28144.
Zhou, Guangni, Zhu, Wenxin, Shen, Hao, Li, Yao, Zhang, Anfeng, Tamura, Nobumichi, & Chen, Kai. Real-time microstructure imaging by Laue microdiffraction: A sample application in laser 3D printed Ni-based superalloys. United States. doi:10.1038/srep28144.
Zhou, Guangni, Zhu, Wenxin, Shen, Hao, Li, Yao, Zhang, Anfeng, Tamura, Nobumichi, and Chen, Kai. 2016. "Real-time microstructure imaging by Laue microdiffraction: A sample application in laser 3D printed Ni-based superalloys". United States. doi:10.1038/srep28144. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1379400.
@article{osti_1379400,
title = {Real-time microstructure imaging by Laue microdiffraction: A sample application in laser 3D printed Ni-based superalloys},
author = {Zhou, Guangni and Zhu, Wenxin and Shen, Hao and Li, Yao and Zhang, Anfeng and Tamura, Nobumichi and Chen, Kai},
abstractNote = {Synchrotron-based Laue microdiffraction has been widely applied to characterize the local crystal structure, orientation, and defects of inhomogeneous polycrystalline solids by raster scanning them under a micro/nano focused polychromatic X-ray probe. In a typical experiment, a large number of Laue diffraction patterns are collected, requiring novel data reduction and analysis approaches, especially for researchers who do not have access to fast parallel computing capabilities. In this article, a novel approach is developed by plotting the distributions of the average recorded intensity and the average filtered intensity of the Laue patterns. Visualization of the characteristic microstructural features is realized in real time during data collection. As an example, this method is applied to image key features such as microcracks, carbides, heat affected zone, and dendrites in a laser assisted 3D printed Ni-based superalloy, at a speed much faster than data collection. Such analytical approach remains valid for a wide range of crystalline solids, and therefore extends the application range of the Laue microdiffraction technique to problems where real-time decision-making during experiment is crucial (for instance time-resolved non-reversible experiments).},
doi = {10.1038/srep28144},
journal = {Scientific Reports},
number = 1,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}

Journal Article:
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