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Title: An overview of TOUGH-based geomechanics models

Abstract

After the initial development of the first TOUGH-based geomechanics model 15 years ago based on linking TOUGH2 multiphase flow simulator to the FLAC3D geomechanics simulator, at least 15 additional TOUGH-based geomechanics models have appeared in the literature. This development has been fueled by a growing demand and interest for modeling coupled multiphase flow and geomechanical processes related to a number of geoengineering applications, such as in geologic CO 2 sequestration, enhanced geothermal systems, unconventional hydrocarbon production, and most recently, related to reservoir stimulation and injection-induced seismicity. This paper provides a short overview of these TOUGH-based geomechanics models, focusing on some of the most frequently applied to a diverse set of problems associated with geomechanics and its couplings to hydraulic, thermal and chemical processes.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE); USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Geothermal Technologies Office (EE-4G)
OSTI Identifier:
1379342
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Computers and Geosciences
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 108; Journal ID: ISSN 0098-3004
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES

Citation Formats

Rutqvist, Jonny. An overview of TOUGH-based geomechanics models. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.cageo.2016.09.007.
Rutqvist, Jonny. An overview of TOUGH-based geomechanics models. United States. doi:10.1016/j.cageo.2016.09.007.
Rutqvist, Jonny. 2016. "An overview of TOUGH-based geomechanics models". United States. doi:10.1016/j.cageo.2016.09.007. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1379342.
@article{osti_1379342,
title = {An overview of TOUGH-based geomechanics models},
author = {Rutqvist, Jonny},
abstractNote = {After the initial development of the first TOUGH-based geomechanics model 15 years ago based on linking TOUGH2 multiphase flow simulator to the FLAC3D geomechanics simulator, at least 15 additional TOUGH-based geomechanics models have appeared in the literature. This development has been fueled by a growing demand and interest for modeling coupled multiphase flow and geomechanical processes related to a number of geoengineering applications, such as in geologic CO2 sequestration, enhanced geothermal systems, unconventional hydrocarbon production, and most recently, related to reservoir stimulation and injection-induced seismicity. This paper provides a short overview of these TOUGH-based geomechanics models, focusing on some of the most frequently applied to a diverse set of problems associated with geomechanics and its couplings to hydraulic, thermal and chemical processes.},
doi = {10.1016/j.cageo.2016.09.007},
journal = {Computers and Geosciences},
number = ,
volume = 108,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

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