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Title: Identification Approach to Alleviate Effects of Unmeasured Heat Gains for MIMO Building Thermal Systems

Abstract

It is important to have practical methods for constructing a good mathematical model for a building's thermal system for energy audits, retrofit analysis and advanced building controls, e.g. model predictive control. Identification approaches based on semi-physical model structures are popular in building science for those purposes. However conventional gray box identification approaches applied to thermal networks would fail when significant unmeasured heat gains present in estimation data. Although this situation is very common and practical, there has been little research to tackle this issue in building science. This paper presents an overall identification approach to alleviate influences of unmeasured disturbances, and hence to obtain improved gray-box building models. The approach was applied to an existing open space building and the performance is demonstrated.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
  2. Purdue University
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1378883
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-5500-69120
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the 2017 American Control Conference (ACC), 24-26 May 2017, Seattle, Washington
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; buildings; heating systems; thermostats; temperature measurement; mathematical model; predictive models; thermal resistance

Citation Formats

Cai, Jie, Kim, Donghun, and Braun, James E. Identification Approach to Alleviate Effects of Unmeasured Heat Gains for MIMO Building Thermal Systems. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.23919/ACC.2017.7962929.
Cai, Jie, Kim, Donghun, & Braun, James E. Identification Approach to Alleviate Effects of Unmeasured Heat Gains for MIMO Building Thermal Systems. United States. doi:10.23919/ACC.2017.7962929.
Cai, Jie, Kim, Donghun, and Braun, James E. 2017. "Identification Approach to Alleviate Effects of Unmeasured Heat Gains for MIMO Building Thermal Systems". United States. doi:10.23919/ACC.2017.7962929.
@article{osti_1378883,
title = {Identification Approach to Alleviate Effects of Unmeasured Heat Gains for MIMO Building Thermal Systems},
author = {Cai, Jie and Kim, Donghun and Braun, James E.},
abstractNote = {It is important to have practical methods for constructing a good mathematical model for a building's thermal system for energy audits, retrofit analysis and advanced building controls, e.g. model predictive control. Identification approaches based on semi-physical model structures are popular in building science for those purposes. However conventional gray box identification approaches applied to thermal networks would fail when significant unmeasured heat gains present in estimation data. Although this situation is very common and practical, there has been little research to tackle this issue in building science. This paper presents an overall identification approach to alleviate influences of unmeasured disturbances, and hence to obtain improved gray-box building models. The approach was applied to an existing open space building and the performance is demonstrated.},
doi = {10.23919/ACC.2017.7962929},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}

Conference:
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