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Title: Boosted Premixed-LTGC / HCCI Combustion of EHN-doped Gasoline for Engine Speeds Up to 2400 rpm.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1378851
Report Number(s):
SAND2016-8389C
Journal ID: ISSN 1946--3944; 646940
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 4; Conference: Proposed for presentation at the SAE 2016 International Powertrains, Fuels and Lubricants Meeting held October 24-26, 2016 in Baltimore, MD.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Ji, Chunsheng, Dec, John E., Dernotte, Jeremie, and Cannella, William. Boosted Premixed-LTGC / HCCI Combustion of EHN-doped Gasoline for Engine Speeds Up to 2400 rpm.. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.4271/2016-01-2295.
Ji, Chunsheng, Dec, John E., Dernotte, Jeremie, & Cannella, William. Boosted Premixed-LTGC / HCCI Combustion of EHN-doped Gasoline for Engine Speeds Up to 2400 rpm.. United States. doi:10.4271/2016-01-2295.
Ji, Chunsheng, Dec, John E., Dernotte, Jeremie, and Cannella, William. Mon . "Boosted Premixed-LTGC / HCCI Combustion of EHN-doped Gasoline for Engine Speeds Up to 2400 rpm.". United States. doi:10.4271/2016-01-2295. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1378851.
@article{osti_1378851,
title = {Boosted Premixed-LTGC / HCCI Combustion of EHN-doped Gasoline for Engine Speeds Up to 2400 rpm.},
author = {Ji, Chunsheng and Dec, John E. and Dernotte, Jeremie and Cannella, William},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {10.4271/2016-01-2295},
journal = {},
number = 4,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Conference:
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  • Low-temperature gasoline combustion (LTGC), based on the compression ignition of a premixed or partially premixed dilute charge, can provide thermal efficiencies (TE) and maximum loads comparable to those of turbo-charged diesel engines, and ultra-low NOx and particulate emissions. Intake boosting is key to achieving high loads with dilute combustion, and it also enhances the fuel's autoignition reactivity, reducing the required intake heating or hot residuals. These effects have the advantages of increasing TE and charge density, allowing greater timing retard with good stability, and making the fuel Φ- sensitive so that partial fuel stratification (PFS) can be applied for highermore » loads and further TE improvements. However, at high boost the autoignition reactivity enhancement can become excessive, and substantial amounts of EGR are required to prevent overly advanced combustion. Accordingly, an experimental investigation has been conducted to determine how the tradeoff between the effects of intake boost varies with fuel-type and its impact on load range and TE. Five fuels are investigated: a conventional AKI=87 petroleum-based gasoline (E0), and blends of 10 and 20% ethanol with this gasoline to reduce its reactivity enhancement with boost (E10 and E20). Furthermore, a second zero-ethanol gasoline with AKI=93 (matching that of E20) was also investigated (CF-E0), and some neat ethanol data are also reported.« less
  • In recent years a number of studies have demonstrated that boosted operation combined with external EGR is a path forward for expanding the high load limit of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) operation with the negative valve overlap (NVO) valve strategy. However, the effects of fuel composition with this strategy have not been fully explored. In this study boosted HCCI combustion is investigated in a single-cylinder research engine equipped with direct injection (DI) fueling, cooled external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), laboratory pressurized intake air, and a fully-variable hydraulic valve actuation (HVA) valve train. Three fuels with significant compositional differences aremore » investigated: regular grade gasoline (RON = 90.2), 30% ethanol-gasoline blend (E30, RON = 100.3), and 24% iso-butanol-gasoline blend (IB24, RON = 96.6). Results include engine loads from 350 to 800 kPa IMEPg for all fuels at three engine speeds 1600, 2000, and 2500 rpm. All operating conditions achieved thermal efficiency (gross indicated efficiency) between 38 and 47%, low NOX emissions ( 0.1 g/kWh), and high combustion efficiency ( 96.5%). Detailed sweeps of intake manifold pressure (atmospheric to 250 kPaa), EGR (0 25% EGR), and injection timing are conducted to identify fuel-specific effects. The major finding of this study is that while significant fuel compositional differences exist, in boosted HCCI operation only minor changes in operational conditions are required to achieve comparable operation for all fuels. In boosted HCCI operation all fuels were able to achieve matched load-speed operation, whereas in conventional SI operation the fuel-specific knock differences resulted in significant differences in the operable load-speed space. Although all fuels were operable in boosted HCCI, the respective air handling requirements are also discussed, including an analysis of the demanded turbocharger efficiency.« less
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  • Abstract not provided.