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Title: H 2-saturation of high affinity H 2-oxidizing bacteria alters the ecological niche of soil microorganisms unevenly among taxonomic groups

Abstract

Soil microbial communities are continuously exposed to H 2 diffusing into the soil from the atmosphere. N 2-fixing nodules represent a peculiar microniche in soil where H 2 can reach concentrations up to 20,000 fold higher than in the global atmosphere (0.530 ppmv). In this study, we investigated the impact of H 2 exposure on soil bacterial community structure using dynamic microcosm chambers simulating soil H 2 exposure from the atmosphere and N 2-fixing nodules. Biphasic kinetic parameters governing H 2 oxidation activity in soil changed drastically upon elevated H 2 exposure, corresponding to a slight but significant decay of high affinity H 2-oxidizing bacteria population, accompanied by an enrichment or activation of microorganisms displaying low-affinity for H 2. In contrast to previous studies that unveiled limited response by a few species, the relative abundance of 958 bacterial ribotypes distributed among various taxonomic groups, rather than a few distinct taxa, was influenced by H 2 exposure. Furthermore, correlation networks showed important alterations of ribotype covariation in response to H 2 exposure, suggesting that H 2 affects microbe-microbe interactions in soil. Taken together, our results demonstrate that H 2-rich environments exert a direct influence on soil H 2-oxidizing bacteria in additionmore » to indirect effects on other members of the bacterial communities.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1]
  1. INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Laval, Quebec (Canada)
  2. Biomonitoring National Research Council Canada, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)
  3. USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1378719
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
PeerJ
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 2167-8359
Publisher:
PeerJ Inc.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Soil; Microbial ecology; Correlation network

Citation Formats

Piché-Choquette, Sarah, Tremblay, Julien, Tringe, Susannah G., and Constant, Philippe. H2-saturation of high affinity H2-oxidizing bacteria alters the ecological niche of soil microorganisms unevenly among taxonomic groups. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.7717/peerj.1782.
Piché-Choquette, Sarah, Tremblay, Julien, Tringe, Susannah G., & Constant, Philippe. H2-saturation of high affinity H2-oxidizing bacteria alters the ecological niche of soil microorganisms unevenly among taxonomic groups. United States. doi:10.7717/peerj.1782.
Piché-Choquette, Sarah, Tremblay, Julien, Tringe, Susannah G., and Constant, Philippe. Thu . "H2-saturation of high affinity H2-oxidizing bacteria alters the ecological niche of soil microorganisms unevenly among taxonomic groups". United States. doi:10.7717/peerj.1782. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1378719.
@article{osti_1378719,
title = {H2-saturation of high affinity H2-oxidizing bacteria alters the ecological niche of soil microorganisms unevenly among taxonomic groups},
author = {Piché-Choquette, Sarah and Tremblay, Julien and Tringe, Susannah G. and Constant, Philippe},
abstractNote = {Soil microbial communities are continuously exposed to H2 diffusing into the soil from the atmosphere. N2-fixing nodules represent a peculiar microniche in soil where H2 can reach concentrations up to 20,000 fold higher than in the global atmosphere (0.530 ppmv). In this study, we investigated the impact of H2 exposure on soil bacterial community structure using dynamic microcosm chambers simulating soil H2 exposure from the atmosphere and N2-fixing nodules. Biphasic kinetic parameters governing H2 oxidation activity in soil changed drastically upon elevated H2 exposure, corresponding to a slight but significant decay of high affinity H2-oxidizing bacteria population, accompanied by an enrichment or activation of microorganisms displaying low-affinity for H2. In contrast to previous studies that unveiled limited response by a few species, the relative abundance of 958 bacterial ribotypes distributed among various taxonomic groups, rather than a few distinct taxa, was influenced by H2 exposure. Furthermore, correlation networks showed important alterations of ribotype covariation in response to H2 exposure, suggesting that H2 affects microbe-microbe interactions in soil. Taken together, our results demonstrate that H2-rich environments exert a direct influence on soil H2-oxidizing bacteria in addition to indirect effects on other members of the bacterial communities.},
doi = {10.7717/peerj.1782},
journal = {PeerJ},
number = 3,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 10 00:00:00 EST 2016},
month = {Thu Mar 10 00:00:00 EST 2016}
}

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Cited by: 5 works
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Works referenced in this record:

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Search and clustering orders of magnitude faster than BLAST
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