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Title: MEG biomarker of Alzheimer's disease: Absence of a prefrontal generator during auditory sensory gating

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [1]
  1. Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Croatia
  2. Department of Radiology, UNM School of Medicine, Albuquerque New Mexico, The Mind Research Network, Albuquerque New Mexico
  3. The Mind Research Network, Albuquerque New Mexico
  4. Department of Neurology, UNM School of Medicine, Albuquerque New Mexico, New Mexico VA Healthcare System, Albuquerque New Mexico
  5. Department of Neurology, UNM School of Medicine, Albuquerque New Mexico, Department of Internal Medicine, UNM School of Medicine, Albuquerque New Mexico
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1378378
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-99ER62764
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Human Brain Mapping
Additional Journal Information:
Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 15:58:29; Journal ID: ISSN 1065-9471
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Josef Golubic, Sanja, Aine, Cheryl J., Stephen, Julia M., Adair, John C., Knoefel, Janice E., and Supek, Selma. MEG biomarker of Alzheimer's disease: Absence of a prefrontal generator during auditory sensory gating. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/hbm.23724.
Josef Golubic, Sanja, Aine, Cheryl J., Stephen, Julia M., Adair, John C., Knoefel, Janice E., & Supek, Selma. MEG biomarker of Alzheimer's disease: Absence of a prefrontal generator during auditory sensory gating. United States. doi:10.1002/hbm.23724.
Josef Golubic, Sanja, Aine, Cheryl J., Stephen, Julia M., Adair, John C., Knoefel, Janice E., and Supek, Selma. 2017. "MEG biomarker of Alzheimer's disease: Absence of a prefrontal generator during auditory sensory gating". United States. doi:10.1002/hbm.23724.
@article{osti_1378378,
title = {MEG biomarker of Alzheimer's disease: Absence of a prefrontal generator during auditory sensory gating},
author = {Josef Golubic, Sanja and Aine, Cheryl J. and Stephen, Julia M. and Adair, John C. and Knoefel, Janice E. and Supek, Selma},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/hbm.23724},
journal = {Human Brain Mapping},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on July 17, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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