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Title: Calibration of paired watersheds: Utility of moving sums in presence of externalities

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [4];  [3];  [5];  [4];  [4];  [4]
  1. The Climate Corporation, 4 Cityplace Dr St. Louis MO USA
  2. Center for Forested Wetlands Research, USDA-Forest Service, 3734 Hwy 402 Cordesville SC 29434 USA
  3. University of Georgia, 597 D. W. Brooks Drive Athens GA 30602 USA
  4. Biological and Agricultural Engineering Department, North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7625 Raleigh NC USA
  5. Weyerhaeuser Company, P.O. Box 2288 Columbus MS 39704-2288 USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1378375
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Hydrological Processes
Additional Journal Information:
Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 15:37:51; Journal ID: ISSN 0885-6087
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Ssegane, Herbert, Amatya, Devendra M., Muwamba, Augustine, Chescheir, George M., Appelboom, Tim, Tollner, E. W., Nettles, Jami E., Youssef, Mohamed A., Birgand, François, and Skaggs, R. W.. Calibration of paired watersheds: Utility of moving sums in presence of externalities. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/hyp.11248.
Ssegane, Herbert, Amatya, Devendra M., Muwamba, Augustine, Chescheir, George M., Appelboom, Tim, Tollner, E. W., Nettles, Jami E., Youssef, Mohamed A., Birgand, François, & Skaggs, R. W.. Calibration of paired watersheds: Utility of moving sums in presence of externalities. United Kingdom. doi:10.1002/hyp.11248.
Ssegane, Herbert, Amatya, Devendra M., Muwamba, Augustine, Chescheir, George M., Appelboom, Tim, Tollner, E. W., Nettles, Jami E., Youssef, Mohamed A., Birgand, François, and Skaggs, R. W.. Sun . "Calibration of paired watersheds: Utility of moving sums in presence of externalities". United Kingdom. doi:10.1002/hyp.11248.
@article{osti_1378375,
title = {Calibration of paired watersheds: Utility of moving sums in presence of externalities},
author = {Ssegane, Herbert and Amatya, Devendra M. and Muwamba, Augustine and Chescheir, George M. and Appelboom, Tim and Tollner, E. W. and Nettles, Jami E. and Youssef, Mohamed A. and Birgand, François and Skaggs, R. W.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/hyp.11248},
journal = {Hydrological Processes},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Sun Jun 11 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sun Jun 11 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on September 4, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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